New Winds are Blowing

Big discussions at our breakfast table. Are windfarms a mutilation of our coast or the best way to satisfy our hunger for energy? In our region with a low relief-energy using the wind is the most economical way of producing energy without contributing to global warming.

Große Diskussionen am Frühstückstisch. Sind Windfarmen eine Verschandelung unserer Küste oder die beste Möglichkeit unseren Energiehunger zu stillen? In einem Gebiet wie unserem mit geringer Reliefenergie ist Windkraft immerhin die billigste Weise der Energieerzeugung und das ohne die globale Erwärmung zu erhöhen.

A friend of ours who sails the sea every day for catching crabs and lobsters is fiercely against these huge wind turbines. Like Don Quichote he would love to fight them. “One quality of the sea is the unobstructed view of the endless horizon!” he is complaining.
Siri 🙂 and 🙂 Selma object that we all are using more and energy by buying nonsensical gadgets. Energy is needed to produce, use and dispose of them. “How should we get all the energy for this?” ask the two sisters. Surely, the answer is to cut down consuming, is our Master’s reply. But he knows that this is not enforceable. Unfortunately, e-mobility we all fancy needs lots of electricity as well.

Dina feels uncomfortable that we write as it is. But we Bookfayries are not stupid! We know that most gadgets are not only senseless but also unnecessary and highly non-ecological. We agree with Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth that it is utterly irresponsible to indulge one’s destructive joy using unnecessary gadgets. And it’s getting completely absurd to complain about global warming which oneself caused.  

Ein Freund von uns, der als Krebsfischer mehr oder weniger jeden Tag aufs Meer fährt, ist ein Feind der riesigen Windmühlen, gegen die er am liebsten wie Don Quichote in den Krieg ziehen würde. “Eine der Eigenschaften des Meers ist doch der unendliche unverstellte Horizont!” beschwert er sich.
Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma halten dagegen, dass wir alle zunehmend mehr Energie verbrauchen u.a. durch unsinnige Gadgets bei deren Produktion, deren Betrieb und Entsorgung. “Wo soll die denn herkommen?” fragen sie. Die Antwort ist weniger konsumieren, meint Masterchen wohl wissend, dass dies nicht durchsetzbar ist. Leider benötigen Elektroautos, mit denen wir liebäugeln, auch Mengen von Strom.

Dina protestiert. Sie möchte nicht, dass wir die Realität benennen, dass wir nicht schreiben, wie wir Buchfeen meinen, dass die Mehrzahl der Gadgets nicht nur unsinning sondern auch unnötig und hoch umweltzerstörend sind. Wir finden wie Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, es ist unverantwortlich, seinen Spaß an unnötigen Gadgets zu frönen. Es wird völlig absurd, sich dann über globale Erwärmung zu beschweren, deren Ursache man selbst ist.

Quite some contemporaries saw lighthouses as a mutilation of the coasts when a lot of lighthouses were built at the beginning of the 19th c. Today they are hot points of tourism. They are romanticised buildings inspiring not only authors. Maybe that will be the fate of off-shore wind farms as well? Now we kind of like the graphics of the turbines at the horizon after years of struggling. – Well, people get accustomed to (nearly) everything.  

Als zu Beginn 19. Jh. durch Fresnels Leuchtfeuertechnik die Küsten mit Leuchttürmen versehen wurden, fanden einige seiner Zeitgenossen das ebenfalls als Verschandelung der Küsten. Heute gelten sie als romantisch belegte Anziehungspunkte für Touristen und Inspirationsquelle für Schriftsteller. Ob diese auch das Schicksal der Off-Shore Windfarmen seien wird, fragen wir uns? Nach Jahren des Haderns betört uns heute die Grafik dieser Bauwerke am Horizont. – Naja, der Mensch gewöhnt sich an (fast) alles.

Greetings from the not longer hot Norfolk coast
Mit lieben Grüßen vom heißen Norfolk
The Fab Four of Cley

 

 

© Text and illustrations, Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar, Cley next the Sea, 2019

 

174 thoughts

    • Dear Margaret,
      we absolutely agree with you. Simplify your life is the answer and there is actually a movement with this name on the continent. We suppose it’s important that schools have to start to teach a higher consciousness concerning ecology and consumerism.
      Thanks for commenting 🙂 🙂
      Wishing you a great Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  1. Windfarms at sea are infinitely preferable to nuclear power stations, or fields being given over to acres of unsightly black solar panels.
    I think that they can appear to be almost beautiful in some light too.
    The young people are already used to them, and new generations will just accept them as part of the landscape, as we did with pylons in my youth.
    A good discussion point though, and wonderful photos too.
    Love from Beetley, Pete an Ollie. X

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good afternoon, dear Pete,
      no doubt, these off-shore and near-shore windfarms are a much better solution than nuclear and other power stations. For us solar panels are acceptable as well. There exist this project of the EU to install a huge area of solar panels in the Sahara desert. The problem seems to be to store the energy. But with a combination of wind and sun there might be a constant flow of enough energy. Nevertheless, without simplifying our life we will face an ecological disaster.
      Thank you very much for liking our post 🙂 🙂
      Love from the rainy coast
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  2. I agree and don’t find them all that mutilating and liked the comparison with the lighthouses, too. I usually say: people go to the Netherlands to look at all these picturesque windmills and take photos with no end – and they were built for their energy-producing qualities as well…

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Barbara,
      it’s amazing how conservative our perception is: We tend romanticise the 19th c. lighthouses and the windmills in the Netherlands but we tend to object to modern architectural structures of windfarms. But we are sure we all get used to these windfarms.
      Thanks and have an easy Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Only one observation about this interesting post.
    They are expesive to build, install & maintain. How long before that investment makes a return in the form of cheap & environmentally friendly energy? Put it another way – their carbon footprint must be horrendous.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear David,
      we have no idea about their carbon footprint. But have a look here
      https://cleantechnica.com/2014/05/07/wind-power/
      It seems to be that from all current technologies of producing energy windfarms perform best concerning their carbon footprint. Economically the amortisation-rates is best as well. You can find a lot of information about these questions in many scientific papers and the net.
      Thanks for your comment 🙂 🙂
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • It’s a somewhat controversial issue, but I fully agree that after instalation and during their 25 to 30 year life span, the Co2 F/print is negligible. But, most of the through life costings/Co2 from manufacture to decommissioning seem to be put forward by agencies directly concerned in promoting them. USA, Australia & to a lesser degree UK have published independent reports pointing out that without the subsidies given, they are not as cost effective as first thought. Gas would seem to be the answer if all factors are taken into account. It doesn’t depend on rare earth metals with their limited supply, generators have a long lifespan & are not reliant on wind speed high or low, manufacture/decommissioning cost are spread over a far longer period so cheaper.
      Then again it’s all academic because some countries will still demand cheap electricity and don’t care how they generate it, which IMHO is of far more concern than an unsustainable use of wind power.
      This is one of those discussions that needs to be done over a bottle of Malt 😉

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dear David,
      thank you VERY much for your interesting commentary. It’s very much appreciated.
      We noticed that we don’t know enough about these problems of wind farms. So let’s get the bottle of malt out – our dear Master likes Lagavulin 16 and Connemara Peated Whiskey – and talk about it 😉
      Thanks again
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ha, Lagavulin 🙂 very good (although 25 years ago the 12 was better than the 16) but it became hard to get in Oman, Talisker was more popular there. Now back in UK I’ve been drinking Laphroaig but even that has changed in resent years.
      Regards David.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear David,
      I noticed this as well, but nevertheless I still like Laphroaig.
      What a coincident, we have friends in our next village who lived most of their working-life in Oman.
      Greetings from the little village next the big sea
      Klausbernd and the rest of The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I’ve known this coast since boyhood (a long time) and I feel slightly ambivalent when I see the interrupted horizon from different points around the coast for the first time. But now rarely have a second thought. They are preferable to most ways of generating energy and do have a certain elegance. I’ve always wondered why we’ve not managed to harness the tides for energy. Good photos.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. That’s a good point you’re making there, clever Bookfayries. We cannot continue to consume and pollute this planet without uncomfortable consequences. Dina’s photos of the wind farms make them look very arty and almost beautiful, I really like them.

    Wind farms have been THE topic in Norway for quite some time now. Do you have any wind farms on shore or on land in Norfolk? In areas of outstanding natural beauty? The windmills are far from popular among those wanting to preserve Norway’s untouched nature. Have you heard of the conflicts concerning the island of Frøya? Last May the Norwegian government went to the dramatic extent on of halting, at least temporarily, construction of a highly contested wind energy project on the island. It’s just one of many where windmill opponents have resorted to public demonstrations, civil disobedience and even vandalism in their efforts to block construction of the huge turbines they claim will ruin scenic nature forever.
    30 more on land projects are planned for the coming years, already causing a heated discussion dividing the opponents. Not quite as much as Brexit in your country, but once you get going … 😉

    Have a great Sunday, my dear friends. I’m sure you are happy to have the book fayre at the Cley summer fayre behind you now. How did it go?

    Klem
    Per Magnus x

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Per Magnus,
      selling all those donated books and our doubles at the Cley summer fayre went really well. Our dear master likes selling books, understandable as an author. He has it in his blood. He already had a book stall at the university where he sold second hand books during the lunch break and later several high street bookshops in cities – but you know that, don’t you?

      We haven’t come across windmills on land on our Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. We are not sure but we think (and hope) that no planning permission for such a project would ever be granted.
      Our dear Dina told us about those conflicts in Norway but you don’t read about it in the press here – well, except The Guardian the British press doesn’t inform much of what’s going on abroad. We don’t know enough about this discussion in Norway to say something about it and have an opinion.

      Wishing our dear friend a relaxing Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
      xxxx

      Liked by 2 people

  6. I don’t think we have a choice. We need energy, we don’t want nuclear, nor do we want fossil fuels, so what is the alternative? I think it’s one of those cases where we just have to bite the bullet and say “Well, no, I don’t really think they add much to the scenery, in fact, they detract from it, but we have to be grown-up about it, because life isn’t always fair and sometimes we have to accept something we don’t like in order to live the life we want.” We will get used to them.over time and maybe even grow to love them.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Maris,
      well, we have the choice of using wind, sun or water or a combination of these three to produce energy without adding to global warming. But as long as we consume like we do now we will not really find a solution that makes everybody happy. The source of the energy problem is consumerism. We have to start there making changes. As Margaret in her first commentary writes we have to simplify our lifes.
      Thanks and have a great Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Lieber Klausbernd, liebe Dina (Hanne), liebe Buchfeen,

    ein sensibles Thema, mit unerbittlich sich gegenüberstehenden “Argumantations-Kontrahenten”. Die Gewohnheiten des Menschen sind wie Tanker auf dem Weg zur Hafenmole. Bis sie zum Stehen kommen, sind einige Seemeilen als Bremsweg in Kauf zu nehmen. Vielleicht kommt der Eine oder die Andere erst auf den Trichter, wenn sie höchstpersönlich mit den Folgen des Raubbaus an den natürlichen Ressourcen und die menscheninduzierte globale Erwärmung konfrontiert sind. Die jüngste Hitzewelle in Deutschland und Mitteleuropa mit Temperaturen über 40 Grad Celsius könnten zum Nachdenken angeregt haben. Diejenigen, die hierzulande am Klimawandel zweifeln, werden vielleicht die ersten sein, die ihm durch Klimamigration zun entkommen trachten.
    Wunderbare Bilder von Dina by the way und ein lohnenswertes Thema als Grundlage eines fruchtbaren, lösungsorientierten gesellschaftlichen Diskurses.

    Liebe Grüße aus dem abgekühlten Freiburg hinauf zur kleinen Stadt am Meer 🙂

    Achim

    Liked by 4 people

    • Lieber Achim,
      da hast du wohl recht mit den Gewohnheiten (und eine tolle Metapher, die des Tankers 🙂 ) Wir glauben, es ist auch viel pure Dummheit, dass Menschen konsumieren und konsumieren, ohne über die Folgen nachzudenken. Es müsste bereits in der Schule ein ökologisches Bewusstsein vermittelt werden. Bewusstsein scheint uns der springende Punkt zu sein.
      Auch hier ist es seit gestern nach ein paar kleineren Gewittern kühler geworden und endlich regnet es. Der Garten hatte es bitter nötig. Aber wir hatten es nicht so warm wie ihr. Knapp über 30 Grad waren unsere Höchsttemperaturen, was wir jedoch schon viel zu heiß finden. Nun haben wir angenehme 21 Grad. Oh dear, da werden wohl diese Klimamigranten zu uns kommen.
      Liebe Grüße vom Vogelparadies in die Stadt der Bächle
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  8. My Fab Four of Cley,
    As much as we enjoy our gadgets and feel we couldn’t possibly live with out them, there is a growing renewed interest in the simpler times. I see this in so many forms on the internet (one of our gadgets) to go live off the grid without the gadgets. We have grown so accustom to these items being part of our lives that we are almost afraid to be without them.
    Siri and Selma remind us of what wasteful people we are in abusing energy.
    Have a Wonderful week, my friends.
    GP Cox

    Liked by 4 people

    • Our dear American friend,
      as more and more people noticed that they eat too much and too unhealthy food, so they have to understand that they consume too much on every level. Our Bookfayries think we should start a kind of fasting of using gadgets. We always don’t use mobile phones and other gadgets when we do our regular fasting (twice a year only). It’s harder than not to eat – well, we eat a little but no junk food. We notice that life without these gadgets is easier. We noticed as well that at least in the first world the young and the more educated young people are willing to simplify their life. There is hope! Greta Thunberg has quite an influence at least here in Europe to rise the conscience of students and teenies. It seems to us that people of our age are the problem.
      We wish you a wonderful weekend as well
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  9. There is much to say about it ..
    It is sometimes said that wind turbines are bad for birds and bats. We have the Thornton bank for the North Sea coast here. Although it is true that many birds are killed by wind turbines every year, this number is less than one percent of the number of birds that come to an early end by cars, windows and cats. I do not know If that’s true. Currently there is measuring equipment here at the Breskens lighthouse. This telemetry project measures how many chipped bats and birds pass the Thornton bank. The results are not known yet. I am curious about the results within a year. Sincerely.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Ahoy dear Matroos
      there was a discussion here as well how many birds would be injured or killed by the propellers of wind turbines. As we live in a bird sanctuary there was quite some research done. It seems to be that the impact of the bird life is minimal, nearly not existent. Here it was the seals and fish getting injured or killed by the underwater mechanism keep the propellers in the wind. But is solved by using nets.
      For us these off-shore windfarms seems to be quite an acceptable solution of producing energy.
      Thanks and cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • That is beautiful and promising news. I also think that offshore wind farms are a very good solution. I also prefer wind and solar energy to nuclear energy or the terrible fossil fuels.

      Liked by 3 people

  10. An interesting conundrum Dina! To me the wind farms look like visitors from outer space. In California they are prolific but not yet on type seas, they are in the countryside. My brother is in the energy business. He says they’re inefficient and cannot address our energy issues. He said nuclear power is by far the best answer but he and I agree after Chernobyl and Three Mike Island they simply are a no-go. The real answer is to use less energy but if course that won’t happen. Perhaps some young genius is working on the problem as we speak and a new answer is just around the corner. We can dream can’t we?!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Tina,
      stupid WordPress. It spammed you for no reason at all. SORRY.
      We absolutely agree, the real answer is cutting down our use of energy. Young folks like Greta Thunberg seem to have understood that. But if we look around we have friends just driving around for fun many miles or are hooked on any new gadget and consumerism in general. This surely has to stop as well as long distant trips just for holidays. There is a lack of awareness. We know a photographer who goes to the Himalayas or Rocky Mountains just for some pictures. These people lack every awareness of what they are really doing. Well, if you look around in the blogosphere here, it’s amazing how many people write with enormous naivity ‘I like travelling’. Anyway, we agree our life style has to change.
      Thanks for your comment.
      Have a great week to come
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  11. Money rules! Unfortunately! And it’s a proven fact that wind turbines on land are cheaper than those at sea, thus the energy companies will always try to get the governments to accept land based turbines, even if such turbines has a massive impact of peoples life qualities all around! It affects the places where they live, their children, the place where they usually spend their vacations and on the top of that – in the long run it will have a negative impact on the tourist industry everywhere on the globe!
    Turbines at sea cost more to operate, thus less revenue may be produced by such! Nevertheless, it’s my humble opinion that turbines on land should NOT be the primary choice! These mastodonts will be there for generations to come, and will spoil the life qualites also for future generations all over the world! And the number of such turbines should be restricted to 120% of what energy plants operated by oil/coal that they replace?! The problem being that as log as money rules, such turbines will probably not replace anything because the owners will carry on operating both types as long as they make a revenue on such operations! And – sea based turbines should be built in energy parks that they could haredly be seen nor heard by people living ashore1
    That said, these turbines , that be on land or by sea, represent a monumental hazard to birdlife, included protected species, and should therefore be restricted to only what’s absolutely necessary!

    Liked by 3 people

    • We don’t know so much about windfarms on land. Here we have the windfarms on Sheringham Shoal. They are 18 – 35 km off the coast on a shallow bit out in the sea. We can’t hear them, at some weather conditions we don’t see them and several researches showed that they cause hardly any danger to the birdlife. In our area we don’t have any wind turbines on land, they are all far out in the sea.
      Thanks for your detailed comment
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Here in Norway we have too many stupid politcian whom bend to energy companies that wants to enhance their revenue. And who won’t?
      At the little lsland of Froeya approximately 5000 people is living, Jyst recently they had to accept a land based wind park with turbines as high as 560 feet into the air and I assure you: They hear the turbines – even in their sleep1
      The Island of Froeya is also a nesting ground for protected sea eagles – for the time being1

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much for the infos.
      As we said before in other answers we only have off-shore wind farms at our coast. They are quite far out in the sea. We can’t hear them and even often can’t see them.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I’ve been wondering if this summer’s heat wave will prompt a wave of air conditioner purchases in Europe. And then wondered where the electricity will come from to run them, and how many cities there have grids that can carry the additional load, etc. Here in the U.S., of course, many of us spend our summers working in artificial arctic conditions – with offices, restaurants, and shopping malls all artificially chilled. I’ve visited offices and noticed people with concealed electric space heaters under their desks, to combat the air conditioning. Near my hometown, there are a couple of windmills that went up, without generating a lot of opposition, because they’re in a light industrial area. When people talk about the view, I suggest they enjoy the perspective from a neighboring hillside, where you’ll see the windmills sharing the scene with a huge smokestack (a new glass-making plant) and farther away, a giant landfill, hundreds of feet tall. The windmills look very attractive in that setting. And perhaps that’s a good place for a lot of them, incorporated into industrial areas – as outdated plants are razed, updated, or replaced, include solar and wind power in the design.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Robert,
      nobody speaks of airconditioners here. I haven’t even seen them advertised. We have the feeling that there is a kind of rejection of airconditioners in Central Europe. At the coast where we live the temperature has never risen much about 30 C (85 Fahrenheit). We think that is too warm but, of course, it’s bearable.
      We are now used to these windfarms. The only problem was an aesthetic one in the beginning.
      Wishing you a happy week to come
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Dear Fab Four,
    To your question “Are windfarms a mutilation of our coast or the best way to satisfy our hunger for energy” my answer is: definitely both at the same time.
    All the best to you from a slightly overcast and not (yet) too hot Fredericksburg,
    Pit

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hi, dear Pit,
      this is exactly how we think about it too.
      Here the weather is nice again: a bit more than 20 C after some rain which filled our water butts.
      Love from the sea
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I think these are inevitable and the lesser of several evils. I must say that the clouds in the lead photo had me so transfixed that I didn’t read for several minutes. Your comments are an excellent summary of the challenges and compromises involved. And I fear that with rising population, climate change, and growing energy needs, compromise will be necessary. We have many wind farms in California, as you might imagine, and I have a learned to live with them. Better than a nuclear power plant built on a fault line. In Dina’s photographs, the bright white pin points of the windmills make a textual counterpoint to the otherwise pure minimalism. Excellent work, Dina.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Michael,
      we agree, compromises are essential. We can live with our off-shore windfarms and even see a certain charme of these windmills as you see in Dina’s pictures.
      Great that you like Dina’s picture! 🙂 🙂 Thank you!
      Have a great time on our little island
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  15. I don’t have a solution to the problem. I don’t like their intrusion on the landscape and seascape but I have to acknowledge that until a more efficient answer is found they have a role to play. A major difficulty with energy conservation is that it needs all of us – worldwide – to accept responsibility.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Louis,
      indeed, that’s the the problem: the solution is energy conservation world wide. It’s already quite a challenge to make people in the first world change their life style. It’s a much bigger problem for third world countries.
      Thanks and have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. The aesthetic battle is repeated everywhere, including the scenic coastal areas of New York and New England. We get used to anything over time. The streets of US east coast cities are filled with utility poles with dozens of wires, but nobody notices any more. Wind farms are growing in numbers, and are thankfully good examples of modern design. And Nina has the wonderful gift of seeing the beauty in everything she sets her eyes on! Happy Summer from too hot New York. I envy your open spaces and breezes!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Peter,
      yes, we are quite happy living in an area of maritime weather. The last days we had sunshine and max. 23 C (73 Fahrenheit) with a soft sea breeze. That’s the weather we like. But on the European continent it was hot as never before. It made people aware of global warming that’s the positive side of it.
      We agree with you that soon we will be used to these windfarms. As long as they the are standing around 15 miles off the coast they actually don’t bother.
      With love from the sunny coast of Norfolk
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I have nothing to add to the argument, I’m afraid. I miss being able to look out to sea and just see sea, but I would rather have wind farms than another nuclear power station at Sizewell.
    I hope you are all keeping well and are enjoying the cooler weather this weekend.
    With affectionate best wishes,
    Clare 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Clare,
      actually, we think those windfarms are okay, at least they are the best solution for our energy problems, a solution that doesn’t add to global warming.
      Today we have a sunny day with temperatures a little above 20 C as you in Suffolk, we suppose. It’s great after this heat wave. But at least it made people aware of global warming.
      We are keeping well, enjoying this weather now working in the garden.
      Thanks for your comment.
      With lots of love from
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Great post. We are seeing these wind farms everywhere now. Communities are finally embracing them as viable energy sources. We thought it a great idea back years ago when BP gas mogul Boone Pickens suggested the idea however back then it was not accepted.

    Liked by 3 people

    • In a way, it was the same here as well. At first, people rejected those windfarms – well, there still some who do – but now most of people see that’s the best solution for producing energy.
      Thanks and cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  19. Thoughtful post about the most critical problem that faces humanity and nature: how to create sustainable energy and not make more of an assault upon the planet, and as important understand the price we are paying for our role in the ill health of the planet.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Lieber Klausbernd & Fab Four,
    Eure Themen, Diskussionen sind stets eindrucksvoll wiedergegeben, textlich und fotografisch, und regen zur Teilnahme an.
    Zur Optik der Energiegewinnung. Die älteren Windmühlen sind vielerorts geschätzte Denkmale wie die Wassermühlen an den Flüssen. Wie mögen sie in ihrer Entstehungszeit betrachtet worden sein? Im Stadtbild früher der Gasturm. Auf Reisen geben im Binnenland der Anblick von Atommeilern – auch jetzt stillgelegte -, Großkraftwerken mit ihrem Dampf und Rauch aus den Schloten einen ambivalenten Eindruck. Mancherorts prägen die Strommasten der Leitungstrassen das Landschaftsbild, und wir haben hierzulande anhaltende Debatten und Proteste dazu. Manche Gegenden sind vollgepflastert mit Windrädern und auch Solaranlagen. Wo vormals Acker und Wiese war, sage ich manchmal: “Da wächst der Strom”.
    Als ich vor über 30 Jahren ein Studienjahr in Aberdeen erleben durfte, gab es bei den Spaziergängen am Strand und dem weiten Meerblick vor der Küste eine Galerie von Öl-Bohrinseln zu sehen.
    Klima-mäßig bevorzuge ich Wind, Wasser und Sonne vor den CO2-Energien. Statt den havarierten Meilern von Fukushima scheinen mir die Windräder bis auf Weiteres eine vertretbarere Wahl. Für den freien Horizont.
    Weiter gute Diskussion
    und herzliche Grüße
    Bernd

    Liked by 3 people

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Bernd,
      man könnte eine interessante Geschichte der Ästhetik der Bauwerke zur Energiegewinnung schreiben und wie diese wahrgenommen wurden. Wir wissen gar nicht, ob es das schon gibt. Es ist ja interessant, wie sich die Einstellung zu diesen Bauwerken über die Jahre änderte. Schon nach ein paar Jahren sehen wir Küstenbewohner hier die Windfarmen eher als interessantes graphisches Element am Horizont als dessen Begrenzung an. Auf der anderen Seite an den Blick auf Öl-Bohrinseln, den wir auch von Schottland von früher her kennen, konnten wir uns nicht gewöhnen. Es ist einesteils die Ästhetik, zum anderen spielt in die ästhetische Bewertung auch unser Wissen mit hinein.
      Uns scheinen auch Wind und Sonne und teilweise auch Wasser (aber mit erheblichen Abstrichen) die besten Lösungen für die Energiegewinnung zu sein.
      Habe herzlichen Dank für deinen ausführlichen Kommentar
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  21. We may not like the looks of wind farms (I see beauty in these non-polluting devices), but if we wish to free ourselves from our dependence on oil and gas, we must be willing to accept this alternative of energy from the sun. After all our planet has been thriving from this source of free energy for millions of years.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Peter,
      you are right, for millions of years our planet got its energy from the sun. This was working effectively. Why change it? Sun produces wind and wind produces our energy > what a clever natural system.
      Actually, we like these windfarms and we are happy that they are a non-polluting device.
      Wishing you a GREAT week and thanks for commenting
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • GREAT, dear Pit! 🙂
      Our question: How would you calculate this? By time one uses to write and to answer the comments?
      Wishing you an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dieses Thema, lieber Klausbernd, ist so unheimlich komplex.
      Zu Deiner Frage: es ist nicht nur meine Nutzung des heimischen Computers, an die ich dabei denke. Es sind auch das Empfangen und Verschicken von Kommentaren hier, das Bloggen, und die Sucherei per Google – um nur ein paar Dinge zu nennen. Wuerde ich persoenlich und ganz fuer mich selber den Umweltschutzgedanken wirklich ernst nehmen, dann muesste ich all diese Aktivitaeten – und noch viel mehr – einstellen. Genau genommen muesste ich muessten wir alle – wie ein Eremit in der Steinzeit leben. Und weil das unmoeglich ist, habe ich fuer diese unsere Welt wenig bis keine Hoffnung.
      Das Thema Umweltschutz wird z.Zt. auch in einem anderen Blog [“The Buddy and the Bear” – https://wp.me/p3QhZ7-g15%5D diskutiert.
      Dazu noch zwei Links:
      https://is.gd/8fFXlN
      https://is.gd/056z1k
      Mit pessimistischen Gruessen,
      Pit

      Liked by 4 people

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Pit,
      Dank für die Links. Du sprichst es ja in deinen Kommentar auf einem der zitierten Blogs an: Das Grundproblem ist die Überbevölkerung. Ich finde es z.B. völlig unverantwortlich, dass Staaten wie die Bundesrepublik mehrere Kinder zu haben steuerlich begünstigt. Es müsste doch genau umgekehrt gehen, dass jede Familie, die mehr als 2 Kinder hat, steuerlich stärker belastet wird. Das Gegenargument der Überfremdung finde ich lächerlich oder sollte ich es faschistoid nennen?
      Übrigens in der aktuellen amerikanische Ausgabe von National Geographic ist das Hauptthema Migration – sehr lesenswert.
      Wir haben heute Morgen wunderbare 18 Grad und ab und an Nieselregen. Super! So leben wir und die Natur auf.
      Aber, lieber Pit, Pessimismus ist doch auch keine Antwort. Versuchen wir uns verantwortlicher zu verhalten und das Beste aus der Situation zu machen.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer nach Texas
      Klausbernd und der Rest der Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Pit,
      hier bin ich nochmal. Ich habe über deinen Kommentar noch einmal nachgedacht und finde, dass Pessimismus die falsche Haltung ist. Aus dieser Haltung können wir einfach weiterleben wie bisher, denn es ist eh alles zu spät. Das ist doch ähnlich, als wenn ich wüsste, ich würde in einem Jahr sterben. Dann würde ich doch all mein Geld ausgeben und in Saus und Braus leben. Die Grundlage eines ökologischen Bewusstseins kann doch nur die Hoffnung sein, dass Umweltkatastrophen abwendbar sind. Ist deine pessimistische Haltung nicht sehr defätistisch?
      Liebe Grüße aus Cley, wo es gerade mächtig regnet
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      sorry, dass es so lange gedauert hat, bis ich hier antworte. Es war einfach im Posteingang schon so weit nach unten gerutscht. Irgendwie bin ich da schizophren: auf der einen Seite total pessimistisch, was die Zukunftsaussichten angeht, aber auf der anderen Seite gebe ich dennoch nicht auf und versuche, meinen – wenn auch sehr kleinen Teil – zur Verbesserung der Situation beizutragen. Und genau da, bei “meinen sehr kleinen Teil”, liegt der Grund fuer meinen Pessimismus. Ich weiss, dass ich eigentlich viel, viel mehr tun muesste, und dass ich doch gleichzeitig schon mehr tue als viele Andere. Und so komme ich eben zu dem Schluss, dass am Ende dem Ganzen kein Erfolg beschieden sein wird.
      Lass’ mich ein Beispiel geben: am Sonntag liegen Mary und ich fuer 10 Tage nach Alaska [u.A. zur Feier unseres 10. Hochzeitstags – aber das nur nebenbei]. Aus Gruenden des Umweltschutzes haben wir keine Kreuzfahrt gebucht, und wir werden auch weder an Walbeobachtungstouren teilnehmen noch uns Alaskas Gletscher von obne per Flugzeug ansehen. Aber dennoch ist das Ganze eben total halbherzig, denn schon mit dem Flug nach Anchorage und zurueck tragen wir ja zum Schaden des Klimas bei. Eigentlich haetten wir ja ganz zuhause bleiben muessen.
      Dieses gesamte Thema ist halt so fuerchterlich komplex.
      Liebe Gruesse aus einem ziemlich heissen Fredericksburg ins kleine Dorf am grossen Meer, und auch an die restlichen 3/4 der Fab Four,
      Dein Pit

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Pit,
      es geht uns ja ganz ähnlich. Wir haben zwar beschlossen, keine Fernreisen zu unternehmen, das Fliegen drastisch einzuschränken, aber was machen wir? Wir fahren fröhlich in den Urlaub nach Wales mit unserem bequemen SUV, der erschreckend viel Sprit braucht. Warum wir überhaupt in Urlaub fahren, ist eine Frage. Wir haben es hier so schön und könnten genauso gut zu Hause bleiben, wo wir alles haben, was wir benötigen. Und warum fahren wir eigentlich einen SUV? Ein kleines E-Auto tät’s ja auch. Auf der anderen Seite versuchen wir in anderen Bereichen ökologisch zu leben und so sustainable wie’s geht. Bei uns ist es teilweise der Einfluss von Bekannten, die stets meinen, man müsste noch dies und das machen oder haben. Klar doch, das müssen wir gar nicht. Und das Erstaunliche ist doch, mit all dem, was man hat und tut, lebt man keineswegs besser, sondern man muss reisen, was längst schon keine Freude mehr ist, man muss sich um Sachen kümmern etc.
      Eigentlich ist unser Leben völlig irrational und absurd, aber das ist wohl der Weg der Entfremdung im Kapitalismus – ganz im Sinne vom alten Kalle Marx. Ich kann schon gut verstehen, warum Marx wieder so in ist.
      Ganz liebe Grüße aus dem angenehm kühlen kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      Klausbernd 🙂 und die anderen drei – übrigens Dina ist wieder zurück.

      Like

  22. Personally I favor solar arrays and micro-grids with storage batteries for use when the Grid is down or under-powered. You make a good point about consumption (of any type), we have a mindset that there’s always more, but never enough. We are running low right now and need to start conserving, each in our own way.

    Have a peaceful week.
    Ω

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Allan,
      we agree, everyone has to find his or her own way to cut down their energy consumption. It’s basic to rise the conscious about the effects of our use of energy. It should be one taught at schools.
      Thanks for commenting.
      We wish you a wonderful week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  23. I don’t care for wind farms. This idea has been known to our predecessors, and has long been rejected for many reasons. I do not support the belief known as Global Warming. We are as specks on the Earth, and barely move all of the needles that our young, earnest scientists utilize. My own 25 years in the bush, photographing butterflies teaches that populations fluctuate, and our greed to build and bulldoze habitat is the big villain.
    Why mar the beautiful views that you so cherish?
    Generate power the traditional ways, and strive for full conservation of the energy that we produce.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Jeff
      What a nice reactionary reductionism comparing people with butterflies and speak about geological dimensions that are sheer speculations. Reminds me on Jean-Jaques Rousseau, let’s all go back into the bush.
      Great, that you presented another view here. Thanks a lot.
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  24. I think we should use whatever type of renewable energy is abundant in our geography. In the Western US, we do a lot with solar and certainly on the prairies, wind is useful. Your photos, to me, show something that doesn’t block a view of the horizon. But yes, it would be better if we simplified and cut down on gadgets and consumption. But, as you say, it’s an individual choice. We just need a few more people making it!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks a lot for your comment 🙂
      We need a lot more people to cut down consuming. But young people and especially students seem to understand this as the Friday-demonstrations of Greta Thunberg show.
      Wishing you a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Yes, I think people have to decide where is best for them to cut after they consume a bit less. I only put about 3,000 miles a year on my car, so feel I can take a few flights domestically. But they’re a big addition to my footprint.

      Liked by 3 people

    • We think the best is to start consuming less where it is easiest for oneself. We are not so keen on travelling so cut there and we don’t need many electronic gadgets, so we don’t buy new notebooks or mobile phones etc. and we don’t have a TV. We only drive for a reason but using the car for holiday trips. Well, that’s a beginning.

      Liked by 3 people

  25. No matter how we live our lives, there will always be ‘pros’ and ‘cons’. I think windfarms far more attractive than the enormous electricity pylons that we currently have. I have a long string of those ugly pylons up and down my local river (behind my home).

    It’s quite clear that global warming is having a negative effect on our planet and those who deny it are ‘burying their heads in the sand’.

    If we all made an effort to recycle, re-forest and reduce (or stop) our use of non-renewable resources, we’d notice a positive impact on our environment in a very short time. Including better education and promoting awareness of the natural world in our schools should be mandatory.

    It’s all very well to educate our children on how to use a computer and other modern technology, but you can’t eat a computer or breathe fresh air when the earth and atmosphere are too polluted to support our existence.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi, dear Vicki,
      we absolutely agree. Ecological awareness has to be taught at schools as an important subject.
      If all would do our little bit it would make a big difference.
      Thanks and have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  26. A necessary evil for now. Hopefully governments will regulate their “planting” prudently to mitigate environmental damage, especially with regard to air and land animal migration routes. Outstanding photos!

    Liked by 2 people

  27. The effect of their vibrations on sea life and the disruption of migration patterns are significant concerns. Like the proliferation of cell towers, there may well be unintended consequences that need to be watched for, and not simply dismissed when they begin to appear. “Full speed ahead” is fine, unless you’re headed straight for the shoals.

    Liked by 2 people

    • As we live here in a big nature reserve and sea reserve a lot of research went into the effects of off-shore windfarms. It seems to be that the negative effects are quite small. Of course, there is the question what alternatives do we have that are not adding to global warming.
      We are not specialists in this field. If you know more about the negative effects, please, let us know. We, and we suppose everyone commenting here, are really like to know.
      Thanks a lot.
      Wishing you a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jacqui,
      our windturbines are 17 to 30 km out on the sea. We never get out so far out with our little boat to hear some noise and anyway we are not allowed to get that near. It’s the off-shore windfarms only we experience here.
      YES, downsize needs is the solution – even if it means changing our lifestyle.
      Thanks and cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  28. I don’t mind them, but I wonder how they affect mariners? My concern about wind energy (and we have a lot of wind turbines in Cornwall though mainly on the land) is that they are inefficient and it is difficult to store the energy. Wave energy is another way but again not making much impression so far – https://www.wavehub.co.uk/ – I reckon a small wind turbine at the end of my garden would supply us with all the energy we need – it is almost always windy here! And I also think that all newly built houses should HAVE to be built as eco houses, with solar panels, ground source heating, triple glazing and grey water collections. There are many ways to reduce energy, we just need to be better at it!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Jude,
      as you write, “there are many ways to reduce energy, we just need to be better at it”. That means we have to rise the awareness concerning energy saving. Best would be if it would start at school.
      Here at the North Norfolk coast all the windfarms are off-shore windfarms (as far as we know). We never came across a wind turbine on land.
      Thanks a lot for your comment. Have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  29. Mir fehlt leider die Zeit alle Kommentare zu lesen 😊 zu viele!
    Es ist deutlich erkennbar wie sehr das Thema den Menschen unter den Nägeln brennt. Ich bin ziemlich gespalten, was diese Parke angeht. Teufel oder Beelzebub? Vielleicht nutzen wir in ferner Zukunft ja irgendetwas vollkommen neuartiges, um uns zu versorgen. Ich meine, wir wollen zum Mars, haben gerade neueste Erkenntnisse aus dem Weltall gewonnen. Ich bin sehr guter Dinge, da wäre noch was drin. Das löst zwar nicht das aktuelle Problem. Vielleicht löst sich das aber auch von alleine, wenn sich die Menschheit selber abschafft. Wir alle sind ja alle mehr oder weniger fleißig dabei. Und auch ich musste heute beim Erdüberlastungstag feststellen, dass mein ökologischer Fußabdruck schlechter ist als ich dachte 🙄
    Du siehst meine Wankelmütigkeit… LG Simone

    Liked by 3 people

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Simone,
      dein Kommentar gefällt uns richtig gut. Auch wir sind erschrocken, als wir feststellten, welchen ökologischen Fußabdruck wir (naiver Weise) hinterlassen. Aber nun achten Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma darauf, dass wir uns bessern und unseren Konsum mehr überdenken.
      Uns stören diese Off-Shore Windfarmen eigentlich nicht, was jedoch nicht immer so war. Zu Beginn fanden wir es irritierend, dass da etwas am Horizont war, wenn wir mit unserem Bötchen hinausfuhren. Nun sehen wir es eher als grafische Kunst am Horizont.
      Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma fragten kürzlich, ob wir zum Mars wollen, da hier auf Planet Erde bald Schluss ist. Wer weiß?
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  30. I think wind turbines are preferable to some other sources of energy (such as nuclear reactors), but the best solution — as you point out — is to reduce our demand in the first place. Sadly, I don’t see much of the developed world doing that until it’s perhaps too late. Thank you for this interesting and thought-provoking post, Klaus and Dina!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Heide,
      thank you very much for your comment.
      We have Siri 🙂 and 🙂 Selma who watch our consume behaviour. They get very angry with us when we consume too much.
      Wishing you a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  31. Pros and cons, for sure. Kind of like the issue of putting more and more satellites up in the sky so everyone can have access to the internet. Some star gazers are concerned that we won’t be able to see the stars at night.

    It’s important that we both develop our alternative resources and reduce our consumption of energy. And somehow protect the natural beauty of the world. Certainly isn’t easy! –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Curt
      you made the point, we have to use all our alternative sources consequently and at the same time protect our natural surroundings and keeping them beautiful. And we have to re-think how we consume.
      Have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  32. Thanks for giving this important issue some space and time. The comments are overwhelming, people do care and we all need to contribute to make a change for our climate. It can’t be a matter of liking or not liking, we have to make a change!
    We use too much, too much of it is toxic and we don’t share it very well. But that’s not the way things have to be. Together, we can build a society based on better not more, sharing not selfishness, community not division.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear James,
      indeed, better not more, sharing not selfishness, community not devision – that’s it. We have to rise the awareness that this is at least one important part of the solution.
      Thank you very much for your comment.
      Have a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • We can all do something and honestly ocusing on life’s simple pleasures — spending time in nature, being with loved ones and/or making a difference to others — provides more purpose, belonging and happiness than buying and consuming. Sharing, making, fixing, upcycling, repurposing and composting are all good places to start.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dear James
      We 100% agree with you. The young Karl Marx had the same idea expressing it in the “Pariser Manuskripte” (1844) – that was the time when he followed Hegel’s ideas. What you describe saw Marx as a remedy to overcome alienation – and we suppose is still is.
      Thanks for your great comment.
      Love
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  33. Heute muss ich Rotkraut mit Wacholderbeeren in meine “Stehende Welle” schaufeln und dann erst mal richtig lange meditieren und dann, dann, viiiiiiiel später, könnte ich mich, eventuell, zu diesem Blogbeitrag äußern…
    Im Odenwald gibt es jetzt auch solche Dinger, ich frage mich, wer das entschieden hat.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Pia,
      mit den Windrädern auf dem Land das ist noch etwas ganz anderes als diese off-shore Windfarmen. Auf dem Land sind sie viel, viel störender, das zumindest finden wir.
      Bis dann.
      Liebe Grüße von der sonnig warmen Küste
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  34. You have given me much to think about! We live in a world with competing interests for our time, money, and opinion. The idea of living simply is very appealing, yet very few understand what that actually means. We need to look at every decision we make and consider the consequences of our actions. We have lived in a time of consumption – it seems that the these habits have been deeply embedded. Recently, I have started a podcast with my mother to look back at the way things were in the 1930’s and 1940’s. Communities worked together for survival. They understood that their gardens were essential, that everything in their household had to be used more than once. I am finding that I must revisit my own actions. We can no longer simply agree that we need to reduce consumption. We must act NOW! Thank you for this brilliant call to action. Hugs and love coming to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, our dear Canadian friend,
      of course, you are right, we need action NOW. We agree with you that we can learn from the past. People lived much more sustainable on the European continent as well then. It seems to us that a lot of people don’t know how to cut down consumption or at least to consume more wisely. Next to consumption the other big problem is overpopulation. We are just too many people on our planet to survive.
      Pit, in his comments above, gives some links showing how one could start to cut down consumption in an acceptable way.
      Thanks for your comment.
      Sending you and your family big hugs and lots of love
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  35. beautiful shots indeed! There is no doubt in my mind that we should welcome all forms of renewable sources of energy! Much better than digging up – and killing – the Earth.

    Liked by 3 people

  36. Habe Hoffnung! Fahre jetzt endlich für ein paar Tage in den Odenwald…
    Allerdings vermute ich schon, dass “Mutter Erde ” sich zu helfen weiß, wenn wir nicht ganz bald umdenken.
    Ich schaue auch in “Buddhas Weg” vorbei…
    Was es Neues gibt…
    Ich glaube die anderen Planeten erwärmen sich auch, das nur am Rande.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Pia,
      wenn du zu der Erwärmung anderer Planeten googelst, findest du, wie so oft bei Google, nur Spinnkram. Ich bekomme eine engl. physikalische Fachzeitschrift und Infos vom Cern, die beide nur von einer Erwärmung außer der Erde von Pluto berichten (der nicht mehr als Planet gezählt wird). Eine Erklärung für Plutos Erwärmung scheint es in Fachkreisen noch nicht zu geben – naja, der ist ja auch unvorstellbar weit weg. Eher gibt es eine Tendenz zur leichten Abkühlung von Planeten unseres Sonnensystems.
      Die Erde wird sicherlich global warming überstehen, ob’s die Menschheit überstehen wird, ist eine andere Frage.
      Schöne Zeit im Odenwald
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hat die Natur eine Frequenz, die durch die WKAs gestört wird?
      Hierzu eventuell Josef Georg im Magazin2000plus Nr. 403.
      Diese Dinger erzeugen bei mir “Puls”.
      Zu den Planeten kann ich leider nichts sagen.
      Dem Internet kann man sicher nicht trauen, bzw. muss sich ganz lange durcharbeiten, um ein Gefühl für “Wahrheit” zu bekommen. Und dann ist es vielleicht doch nur der Blick durch sein eigenes Fenster, aus dem “Haus” heraus, in dem wir alle leben.
      Es könnte ja sogar sein, dass das Gefängnis Erde für uns eingerichtet wird. Mit Todeszelle.
      Ich war neugierig: was treibt Menschen an?
      Was ist die Motivation ihrer Handlungen?
      Mich selbst eingeschlossen, warum will, fühle, denke, handle ich wie…da kam einiges zum Vorschein in den letzten Jahren, nicht alles hat mir gefallen…
      Als Tänzerin fast beruflich notwendig.
      Vieles weiß ich nicht, da müsste ich Fachleute fragen, oje, dann wird es oft auch nicht besser. Es gibt auch Fachidioten und ganz viele, die so tun, als wüssten sie was…
      So, weiter geht der Schneckentanz zur Selbstermächtigung..
      Sende herzliche Grüße aus dem regnerischen Oggersheim und fahre demnächst wieder in den regnerischen Odenwald und hoffe auf Sonne!!!
      Doch, ich glaube eigentlich schon, dass wir intelligenter werden.
      Wir haben ja die Buchfeen!!!
      P.S. ich kenne einen, der kennt eine, die kennt viele, die in der Energie-Geld-Macht-Politik-Frage (die Antwort gibt es ja scheinbar noch nicht…) einige kennt, also, der hat einen mit Holz beheizbaren Kessel im Keller, der dann für eine Woche warmes Wasser speichert…
      Ok, Tschau!

      Like

    • Die Buchfeen, die ja dann mit mir in die Kitas gehen, das wisst ihr nur noch nicht, weil es ein Geheimnis ist, und ich, studieren gerade die Broschüre “Wie funktioniert eigentlich unsere Erde, Ideen zum Forschen und Staunen rund um unser Zuhause”. Außerdem haben wir uns , indirekt, die tolle Ausstellung an der Uni Zürcih angesehen, Erdwissenschaften, Focus Terra Institut….da steht auf so einer Schneckentafel: der Mensch erscheint in den letzten 22 Sekunden…heilige Hasenknoddel!
      Was uns auch krass gut gefallen hat: Die Schautafel “Mineral-Ausfällung aus Lösungen”
      Ok, Tschau! Jetzt wirklich…viiiiiiel zu tun…..

      Liked by 1 person

    • Also liebe Pia, dieses Magazin2000 plus ist eine ganz üble Zeitschrift, klassisch Neue Rechte. Die zeigt sich durch eine krude Mischung von Esoterik, UFO-Spinnereien und rechter Politik. Alles, was du darin findest, ist so etwa ein Viertel Wahrheit. Und wie – ich glaube, es war Nils Bohr oder Einstein – so schön sagte, das Gegenteil von Wissen ist Halbwissen. Viertelwissen ist meistens die Grundlage versuchter Volksverhetzung.
      Also Hände weg davon! Und zitierfähig ist das Magazin2000 plus schon gar nicht. Ich würde eher sagen, weil’s darin steht, kann’s nicht stimmen.
      Liebe Grüße vom sonnigen Meer
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Like

    • Heijeijei, da haben Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma gar nichts von erzählt. Diese Ausstellung des Focus Terra Instituts muss ganz toll sein. Naja, jetzt haben auf Nachfragen die beiden Dina und mir erzählt, dass sie diese Focus Terra Ausstellung gaaaaaanz toll finden. Da haben wir auch gleich geguckt und waren ebenfalls begeistert. ETH bedeutet eben stets Qualität.
      Diese Ausstellung würden wir ja alle gerne real sehen. Da kann man ja dynamische Prozesse auf der Erde bzw. in der Atmosphäre sehen. Wahrscheinlich werden auch die Auswirkungen von unserem Handeln auf global warming dokumentiert.
      Schade, früher waren wir oft in Zürich, aber heute reisen wir nur noch wenig. Es macht keinen Spaß mehr und umweltverträglich ist es ganz und gar nicht. Wir haben doch zu Hause alles, was wir brauchen. Aber zu solch einer Ausstellung wie in Zürich würden wir schon gerne fahren, jedoch der Aufwand ist zu groß, es ist auch zu teuer und mit RyanAir zu fliegen ist ja reiner Masochismus.
      Mit lieben Grüßen an dich und deine Lieben
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Bin zurück. Der Odenwald ist so erholsam!
      Danke für die Erklärungen, Belehrungen, Erläuterungen…
      Erschreckend, was man alles nicht weiß, also ich…
      Begleitung im Wald, ein Rotkehlchen, es verweilte immer auf der chinesischen Zierkirsche. Robin freute sich über Sonnenblumenkerne.
      Daneben wächst ein mächtiger Kirschbaum, die Ernte wird den Vögeln zur Verfügung gestellt, es bleibt eigentlich nichts anderes übrig…
      Erde sehr schön! Stellt alles zur Verfügung, was wir brauchen könnten, dass unsere Seele aufblühen würde, finde ich, dass wir nicht noch krankere Fantasien entwickeln müssten…
      Gerade grübele ich über das Wort: Robinsonade, huiuiui…
      Sende herzliche Grüße nach Cley ins Vogelparadies verbunden mit herzlichem Dank!
      Diese Windräder mag ich nicht so gerne…Veränderungen schon, vor allem , wenn sie Verbesserungen mit sich bringen könnten…

      Liked by 1 person

    • …und weil es gar nicht so einfach ist, die Zeichen der Zeit zu übersehen, Windräder, Reaktortürme, Funkmasten, Werbung überall….Angstmache, Verwirrung, PR…ja und Plastik, Luftverschmutzung (kann man gut riechen, wenn man vom OW nach Mannheim reinfährt)…hungernde Menschen, Umweltkatastrophen, Kriege…
      …und ich aber trotzdem versuche den “Alltag” positiv zu gestalten, denn “all shall be well”, oder, so war das doch, höre ich mir heute noch ein paar mal “Truth” von Prince an, das ich gestern Nacht im Baumhain im Luisenpark bestaunen durfte…und schwinge die Hufe, dass hier wieder ab nächste Woche getanzt werden kann, Danke sehr noch mal!!!
      Schönes Wochenende für Euch!!!!
      Ich weiß gar nicht, was ich ohne Euch Fabfour gemacht hätte….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wir lieben hier auch die Rotkehlchen, liebe Pia. Die hat die liebe Dina fast gezähmt, immerhin fraßen sie ihr aus der Hand. Jetzt macht sie das Gleiche mit den Blackbirds, die voll auf Rosinen abfahren.
      Robinsonaden kamen groß in in Mode im 18. Jh. nach Defoes “Robinson Crusoe”. Es galt als schick, der Kultur zu entkommen. Und eigentlich hat diese Tendenz bis heute angehalten und kehrt in Literatur und Film immer wieder. Robinsonaden sind der klassische Ausdruck eines Kulturpessimismus, der seine volle Blüte jedoch erst ein Jahrhundert später entfaltete.
      Liebe Grüße vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Ach weißt du, in vorigen Jahrhunderten war es ja noch fürchterlicher. Die ständigen Kriege und Hungersnöte im Mittelalter, die Pest und Bauernkriege, Leibeigenschaft und feuchte, stinkige Behausungen voller Ungeziefer, Kinderarbeit, Judenverfolgungen, Glaubenskriege … Also da sind wir heilfroh, dass wir in so angenehmen Zeiten leben dürfen. Gemessen an der Geschichte sind wir doch mega-privilegiert! Das ist Luxuskram, sich z.B. über Windfarmen aufzuregen.
      Mach’s gut, tanze fein
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Schade diese Kulturfeindlichkeit…doch wenn der “Fortschritt” in eine Naturfeindlichkeit mündet, frage ich mich, ob das Fortschritt ist.
      …die Geschichte, in der ich lebe, ist doch ganz schön verzwickt…auch als Tanzpädagogin: wann bin ich streng und wann bin ich liebevoll geduldig bis zu nachgiebig…
      Das Leben lehrt, doch wenn es im Kopf zu viel Irrsinn gibt und im Körper zu viel Gier, wird es echt zum Spagat…
      Eine nette Professorin hielt bei Jonas´Einführungsfeier zum Studium des Physiotherapeuten einen schönen Vortrag:
      man soll doch des Leben wie ein ständiges Kreisen von Theorie und Praxis erkennen. Keine Theorie, die unantastbar über allem schwebt und dann mit der Praxis ständig in Konflikt kommt. Und umgekehrt…
      Die Theorie updaten durch die Praxis, dann wieder in die Praxis eintauchen um dann wieder die Theorie updaten, wenn nötig. Ein Kreislauf.
      Das wirkte auf mich sehr liebevoll und weise.
      Ich finde es halt sehr ärgerlich und unnötig, wenn wir dann wieder den ganzen Windradschrott auftürmen müssen, wenn es doch viel bessere Möglichkeiten gäbe.
      Ich denke dann an den Benjamini, den ich auf den Balkon in die Sonne stellte, ich meinte es gut, er verlor wegen Lichtschock alle Blätter; das war auch nix!
      Heute denke ich über die Wörter Sprachbarriere und Wortberg nach, so nebenbei…
      Herzliche Grüße und Dank!
      Mut ter, das Wort ist auch krass….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Pia,
      das ist so ein Problem mit Natur und Kultur, ähnlich wie mit Theorie und Praxis. Es gibt ja eine Entwicklung, dass die Natur zum neuen Gott, zum Gottesersatz wird. In früheren Zeiten ging es lange darum, sich von der Natur zu befreien. Sollte es jetzt darum gehen, sich von der Kultur zu befreien? Es hängt freilich davon ab, wie man Kultur versteht. Wenn man Natur und Kultur als sich ergänzend sieht und ein ökologisches Bewusstsein und Handeln als Teil von Kultur begreift, dann fällt der Gegensatz zwischen Natur und Kultur zusammen. Es kann unseres Erachtens keineswegs darum gehen, der Natur koste es, was es wolle, den Vorrang vor der Erfüllung menschlicher Bedürfnisse zu geben. Wie du es mit Theorie und Praxis beschreibst, es bedarf eines Ausgleichs zwischen beiden. Wir müssen ökologisch reflektierter Handeln und zugleich auch neue nachhaltige Technologien entwickeln, um unsere Bedürfnisse zu befriedigen. Leider leben wir in Zeiten des populistischen Denkens, in denen man die Welt mit dem Entweder-Oder-Denken zu erfassen sucht. Gerade in Bezug auf die Ökologie wäre das Sowohl-Als-Auch-Denken angemessener. Aber Differenzierung ist z.Zt. politisch schlecht zu verkaufen, wie man an dem Erfolg B. Johnson und D. Trump sieht.
      Anyway, dies sind nur ein paar Gedanken dazu von uns. Wir wünschen dir fröhliches Tanzen. Ja, wir verstehen das sofort, wann bist du streng und wann verständnisvoll nachgiebig (nicht nur beim Tanzen) deinen Schülern gegenüber wie auch dir selber? Nicht nur nach Hegel und Marx ist unsere Welt dialektisch zu verstehen. Das wäre ein Ansatz, unsere Einstellung zur Natur heute begreifen. Zunächst befreiten wir uns von der Naturabhängigkeit (These), jetzt wollen viele sich von der Kulturabhängigkeit befreien (Antithese) und das Ganze bewegt sich hoffentlich auf eine Synthese zu, das wäre z.B. die Entwicklung neuer umweltfreundlicher Technologien. Und von streng und nachgiebig gibt es sicher auch eine Synthese.
      Liebe Grüße vom sonnigen Meer – die nächsten Tage soll es jedoch regnen
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Ajo, des schaffmerschun, des mit dem Synthesizitieren…
      Dann würde das Holzköpferte aufhören…nach dem Motto: was der Bauer nicht kennt…
      The perfect Harmony, alle gesund!
      O Gott, hoffentlich wird das nicht totaly boring…
      Susanne Linke: Denkt dran, sie wollen Action, eure Stücke müssen spannend und am besten gruselig sein, die wollen Blut sehen…
      Also wir hier nicht!!!!!
      Liebdrücker von Pia und der Gang

      Like

  37. Ich finde windfarmen irgendwo schick.
    Einmal haben sie mir auf Fuerteventura den Weg gewiesen!!
    Downsizing: fast niemand ist dazu bereit, wie mir scheint. Man sieht ja den “Greta-effekt” in der weiteren Zunahme des Flugverkehrs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Gerhard,
      wir sehen inzwischen unsere off-shore Windfarmen auch als fesches Design am Horizont. Das hat aber etwas gedauert. Interessant ist auch, dass sie je nach Wetterlage gut sichtbar sind oder völlig verschwinden.
      Wir meinen, ohne Downsizing wird’s unaufhaltbar bergab mit uns gehen.
      Danke und mach’s gut
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
      P.S.: Die Insektenfotos auf deinem Blog finden wir SUPER

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ich habe ziemlich alle Kommentare gelesen.

      Downsizing kann nur sehr allmählich gehen, denke ich. Die Leute ringsum nesteln an kleinen Beschränkungen in ihrem Konsum und Verhalten. Das ist ein Anfang.
      Ich bin allerdings pessimistisch, ob dieses Rücken an Gewohnheiten reichen wird, ob wir die Zeit haben.
      Wie überall gibt es auch Gegenstimmen: 1) Einschränken tue ich mich nicht. 2) Den Klimawandel gibt es nicht. 3) Schau doch nach draussen, auf andere Länder ect.

      Der Club of Rome verkündete seine Warnung fast vor 50 Jahren, zu unserer Schulzeit. Doch das Bewusstsein für eine Änderung bewegt sich schneckenhaft.
      Es kann auch durchaus sein, daß bald niemand etwas von den Problemen mehr hören will – das einzige, was es wohl verhindern mag, sind die Kinder, die in die neue Zeit hineinwachsen und -leben.

      Ich hatte kürzlich einen Film vorgestellt, in einem Blogbeitrag “Mother Earth”. Da ging es um Bergbau in massivster Dimension, Bergbau des 21. Jahrhunderts eben.
      Man freute sich an Ort und Stelle über die fortgeschrittene Technik, über die man heutzutage verfügt.

      Jemand in einem Forum meinte vor 10 Jahren, daß 10 – 15 % der Bevölkerung nötig wären, die tatkräftig und umweltbewusst leben, dann würde dadurch eine allgemeine Bewegung in Gang kommen. Diese 10 % hatte man von einer Schätzung an anderer Stelle, es ist ein alter Gedanke.
      Aber bündele doch mal 10 % der Bevölkerung in eine Richtung!

      Das erst mal soweit.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Gerhard,
      danke für deinen ausführlichen Kommentar 🙂 🙂 very much appreciated!
      10% der Bevölkerung und das noch schnell in eine Richtung zu bringen, halten wir auch für unmöglich und wäre es möglich – im Sinne dass es ein Rezept dafür gäbe – wäre es eine enorme politische Gefahr. Letztlich geht es darum, das Bewusstsein der Massen zu heben. Allerdings sinkt das leider weltweit auf das Niveau des populistischen Nationalismus ab. Dennoch möchten wir irgendwie, wie irrational das auch sein mag, nicht in den Pessimismus verfallen. Klar, wir können das auch, da wir in einem sehr geschützten Landschafts- und Meeresschutzgebiet leben umgeben von umweltbewussten Menschen, aber natürlich wird es bei ökologischen Katastrophen keine Inseln mehr geben. Dennoch werden wir uns frohen Muts für mehr Umweltbewusstsein einsetzen.
      Mit herzlichen Grüßen vom Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dein Blog hat eine ordentliche Reichweite und Du tust das deine, um zu bewegen, das finde ich gut.
      Das mit der angesprochenen Gefahr der 10 % hatte ich mir noch nicht gegenwärtigt, da mag was dran sein. Allzu blauäugig sollte man nicht sein.
      Das Einzige, was man in seinem Umfeld tun kann, ist Beispiel geben. Wohlwissend, daß das nur ein Tropfen auf dem heißen Stein sein kann.
      Was uns wohl helfen kann, sind Innovationen. Man kann ja gut daran verdienen, etwa indem man alternative Brennstoffe entwickelt. Oder abbaubares Plastik. Da sind m.E. viele Firmen und Institutionen unterwegs.
      Welche Widerstände es da aber auf dem Weg der jeweiligen Umsetzung geben mag, wer weiß das alles.
      Aber: Technologische “Schirme”, Krücken müssen aufgespannt werden.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ja, das sehen wir so wie du.
      Wir sahen gestern einen Film von mare über die Åland Inseln, die wir gut von früher kennen, als wir regelmäßig von Turku nach Stockholm fuhren. Dort z.B. wurde ein Fischzüchter vorgestellt, der die Fischabfälle in Treibstoff verwandelt. Dieser kann ohne technische Veränderungen an den Motoren gefahren werden. Die Busse auf Åland fahren mit diesem Fischtreibstoff. Ich hatte noch nie davon gehört. Wie du schreibst, wir benötigen noch viel mehr solch findige Lösungen. Zugleich sollte jeder versuchen, dort wo es ihm leichter fällt zu downsizen.
      Wir wünschen dir ein schönes Wochenende
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Das mit dem persönlichen Downsizen läuft schon bei mir, wennauch nicht durchgängig, aber beispielgebend das eine oder andere Mal auf alle Fälle. Da bleiben wir dran.

      Daß jetzige Lösungen nach und nach revidiert und für bessere/nachhaltigere ausgetauscht werden, das ist der Gang der Dinge.
      Dir auch ein schönes Wochenende!

      Like

    • Der RH
      as we just wrote above, we love lighthouses – well, we are not in the business of wrecking. There was a time that our dear Selma collected books about lighthouses. She could look for hours watch the pictures. It all started after she has heard about Grace Darling when we visited the Farne Islands.
      Thanks and cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  38. I’m glad you’re thinking, and debating…one thing I noticed in Europe was that people seem to talk and discuss things more. I didn’t know that people were opposed to lighthouses on aesthetic grounds at one time – that’s interesting! As for our greedy consumption of resources, that is a hard one! We have to do what we can….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Bluebrightly
      We suppose that thinking, debating and accept ambivalence is our European heritage from the classic cultures. We Fab Four find it utterly boring when people claim to know the truth, a solution or whatsoever. In a way that makes democratic societies that there are different ideas and views and they all are valuable. All undemocratic, highly authoritarian and fascist societies don’t like debate and ambivalences. Nils Bohr once said (in quantum physics) a truth only is true if its opposite is true as well.
      Usually, when we start writing a post for our blog we don’t have a clear idea about what is `right´, what’s the solution, etc. There is his and that we are favouring. We then love the controversial debating in the comments. If we all would agree how boring (actually, this leads to stupidity, doesn’t it?) and we suppose there is something wrong.
      Thanks a lot for commenting. Wishing you a great weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Diese Anlagen sind vor allen Dingen nicht recyclebar, bis heute kein Konzept dafür seitens der Betreiber. Und da kommt ne Menge Schrott auf uns zu, da die Anlagen nicht ewig halten bzw. betrieben werden dürfen. Die ersten werden bald abgebaut …. nur kurios oder etwa doch schon absurd?!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Ulli,
      naja, die Frage ist, was wäre denn die Alternative. Was schlägst du denn vor?
      Danke fürs Kommentieren 🙂 🙂
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ja, liebe Ulli, da hat er sich versteckt. Aus uns unbekannten Gründen fand er deine E-Mail-Adresse unkoscher.
      Jetzt steht er weiter oben.
      Alles Gute
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, we agree too much people living on our planet. And we agree as well that the future will show if our solution were right or not.
      Thank you very much and wishing you a wonderful week to come
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Ruth,
      wir hatten das auch. Mit Safari von Apple können wir immer noch nicht liken, deswegen sind wir zum Bloggen nach Google Chrome gegangen. Google Chrome und WordPress passen gut zusammen, WordPress und Safari können sich irgendwie nicht leiden.
      Habe herzlichen Dank fürs Kommentieren 🙂 🙂
      Wir wünschen dir eine wunderbare Woche
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • You are very welcome, liebe Ruth.
      Wie gesagt, wir haben das gleiche Problem mit Safari.
      Huch, hier gewittert es gerade sehr.
      Mit lieben Grüßen
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: