How Free Is Free?

Spontan kann man etwas Schönes schaffen, aber ich bezweifele, ob man etwas Interessantes spontan schaffen kann.
(Spontaneously you may produce something nice, but I doubt if you can produce something interesting spontaneously)
Klausbernd

Hot discussions “how free is free really“. This is Otto von Münchow‘s fault, his post about spontaneity and free photography.
Marcuse observed that the word ‘free’ is used mainly for situations being not that free. Who freely as spontaneously goes photographing usually produces a picture which fulfills the general horizon of expectation which he shares as well. Writers are in the same situation. The first draft of a text is often shamefully conventional. Exactly this describes the empirical creativity research. Who is producing spontaneously depends much more on the zeitgeist and his personal limitations than on his creativity. 

Erhitztes Streitgespräch “wie frei ist frei wirklich?” Das ist Otto von Münchow Schuld, seine Blogpost von der Spontaneität beim Fotografieren.
Marcuse beobachtete, dass gerade dort das Wort “frei” bemüht wird, wo es nicht so frei zugeht. Wer frei und fröhlich losmarschiert und Fotos knipst, schafft meistens etwas, das dem allgemeinen Erwartungshorizont entspricht, der auch ihn beeinflusst. Beim Schreiben verhält es sich gleich. Die ersten Entwürfe für Texte sind oft beschämend konventionell. Genau dies betont die empirische Kreativitätsforschung. Der spontan Schaffende ist mehr vom Zeitgeist und seinen persönlichen Begrenzungen abhängig als von seiner Kreativität.

Spontaneous producers use more or less consciously their memory. They produce conservatively because they follow the path already travelled. Photographers are strongly influenced by the pictures they have seen as the writers are influenced by what they have read. Thinking as in planning reveals such automatisms and frees the naive sight from its conventional tendency. Spontaneously taken pictures as the first drafts have to be cleansed from all unreflected automatisms to create something new.

Der spontan Schaffende schöpft mehr oder weniger bewusst aus Erinnerungen, d.h. er schafft konservativ, weil er sich an bereits Geschaffenes ausrichtet, an das, was der Fotograf an Bildern gesehen und der Schreibende gelesen hat. Erst die Reflexion entlarvt solche Automatismen. Der Kopf kann spontan Naives aus seiner Konventionalität befreien. Das spontan geschossene Bild wie der erste Textentwurf müssen von ihren Verhaftungen gereinigt werden, um zu Neuem zu gelangen.

Spontaneously written drafts will soon be deleted before somebody sees them. For me real creativity starts with editing what the photographers call ‘post production’. As better the picture or text was planned as easier is editing. Hemingway is an example for the opposite. Spontaneously written text when he was drunk were sometimes more the 50 times rewritten.

Ich erröte schamhaft meine ersten Entwürfe lesend, die ich flugs lösche. Für mich liegt in der Bearbeitung der eigentliche kreative Prozess, in dem, was die Fotografen “Post-Production” nennen. Je mehr jedoch das ursprüngliche Bild geplant wurde, je weniger Post-Production ist nötig.
Das Gegenteil sah man bei Hemingway, der spontan im Suff die ersten Entwürfe seiner Texte schrieb, sie aber oft 50mal und mehr überarbeitete.

For me spontaneous work is of use only if one is blocked like in the famous writer’s block. Is there a photographer’s block too? However that be, I don’t trust spontaneous action preferring planned activities. Of course I know about the dangers there as well. Cleverly planned aesthetic objects might show how they are made too obtrusively and loose their power to move the recipient.

Ich halte spontanes Schaffen nur bei Blockaden nützlich, z.B. bei Schreibblockaden. Gibt es eine Fotografierblockade? Wie dem auch sei, ich misstraue dem Spontanen und ziehe, vom logischen Denken geprägt, das Geplante vor. Allerdings wohl wissend, dass hier ebenfalls Gefahren lauern, dass nämlich das klug geplante ästhetische Objekt zu aufdringlich sein Gemachtsein enthüllt und damit Berührungskraft verliert.

How I see spontaneity in art is based on my expectations. I want to learn something new and hope for an interesting style. From a photo I expect that it draws my interest among the masses of pictures, it has to invite my eyes and my mind to stay by standing out against the usual. What’s standing out attracts attention, as the first Gestalt-psychologist already found out nearly 100 years ago. 

Meine Betrachtungsweise des Spontanen in der Kunst liegt in meiner Rezeptionshaltung begründet. Ich möchte Neues mit interessantem Stil unterhaltsam vermittelt bekommen. Und was erwarte ich von einem Foto? Wenn ich es in der Bilderflut sehe, muss es meinen Blick und mein Interesse (meinen Geist) zum Verweilen einladen, indem es sich vom Gewohnten absetzt. Was sich vom Gewohnten absetzt, weckt Aufmerksamkeit, erkannten bereits die Gründer der Gestaltpsychologie.

Most spontaneous photography is taken with a smart phone. It holds the moment. Such a picture is a document in which more the topic than the style is important. Dina’s pictures in this post are taken spontaneously with her hand held camera (not iPhone) walking in Fredrikstad/Norway at the blue hour.

Die spontanste Fotografie wird mit dem SmartPhone betrieben. Sie hält den Moment fest.
Das spontane Bild dokumentiert, es steht eher das Was als das Wie im Vordergrund. Dinas Bilder hier entstanden bei einem Abendspaziergang (blue hour) spontan mit ihrer hand held Kamera (nicht Smartphone)in Fredrikstad/Norwegen.

Mit lieben Grüßen
Klausbernd
The Fab Four of Cley

 

 

© Text and illustrations, Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar, Cley next the Sea, 2017

 

 

 

 

285 thoughts

  1. This is an interesting topic. Some of my best pictures are taken instantly, without thinking and lacking every photographic ‘rule’. I wish I could repeat that consiously, as a skill, a craft, a deliberate way of looking. I haven’t been able to do so yet. I am quite happy that I once in a while recognize such a picture in the large amounts of images one sometimes produces. That recognition could be appreciated as a kind of skill too. For the time being I think I’ll have to be happy with just that 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hi Peter
      Thanks a lot for your commentary.
      We suppose if you analyse the pictures you like you will internalise a skill to take more pictures of this quality and you will recognise easily a good picture in the masses of pictures you see or you have taken.
      Wishing you a great weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Very nice post and writing. This reminds me of something one of my teachers said when speaking of being a “professional” artist; “Anyone can occasionally make a great photograph, but can you do it at 2:30 in the afternoon on a Tuesday?”

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Lovely photos and interesting architecture too.
    I love seeing towns, houses and shop styles from other countries around the world. They are just as interesting as street photography of people going about their everyday activities in urban areas.

    Spontaneous photos can be good or not so good in my opinion, depends on the photographic eye behind the view finder (or iPhone). Photos that are staged and post processed are exactly the same. Depends of the skill of the photographer’s eye AND their skill in post processing to bring out the best exposure, contrast and composition to be both pleasing to the viewer . Of course one can create something else entirely from the original image to be something more creative and evoke an emotional response like a painting, watercolour , sketch or sculpture.

    Personally, I prefer natural scenes or subjects that are very slightly ‘tweaked’ in post processing (to compensate for my lack of technical skill in the use of my camera usually, although my short-sightedness can sometimes mean a tiny bit of cropping on one or more sides to bring the photographic composition into something I was envisioning when I made the original photo.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Vicki
      Actually we wrote about the photographic eye and we think 💭 that a naive photographic eye produces conventional pictures which bore the onlooker’s eyes 👀
      Thank you very much and warm greetings from our holiday in The Cotswolds
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  4. Oh my, whatever happened to just ‘click’? 😀
    I am a accidentalist, I take 50 photo’s, keep one because it ‘feels’ good, and throw the rest away. What category is that? 😀
    And as usual, Dina’s pictures are lovely, and most certainly that balance between accidental and the ability to ‘see’ the magic in a moment. A new category, a psychic photographer! 😀

    Liked by 7 people

    • Dear Mark
      Feeling good is of course quite subjective. The question is how the onlookers feel – and not in the net because they are always positive there hoping that you will “judge” their photos positive as well, meaning giving at least a like.
      The question is if your photos are different from the all this flood of pictures forced on us. Or with other words: do you contribute to this pp, picture pollution.
      Thanks and all the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

    • True. I try to be a minimalist at my blog site so I have a gallery page for all my pics. That way I’m not bombarding arrivals and they then have the choice to look or not 😀
      And maybe that is because I don’t consider myself a ‘good’ photographer, they are all just ‘shots’ of life as I wander this beautiful world 😀
      In your case though, your site is built on your ‘wanderings’, no photo’s would defeat its purpose in sharing your journey’s. It would be like trying to explain your journey to a blind man, it changes the context of who and what you are.
      Maybe that is what it is all about, a photo speaks a thousand words where otherwise it takes much longer to ‘write’ about what you wish to speak of. And this world doesn’t have the time for that…too much go, go ,go 😀
      Thank you for sharing, and I do hope Dina doesn’t come down with a minimalist virus 😀

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Mark
      thank you very much for your answer.
      You are so right, in the age of acceleration nobody has time, quick and short is the zeitgeist. We are not sure if favoring the vita comtemplativa is a conservative standpoint not wanting to see that there is a new style of art and of seeing is on it’s way.
      Wishing you a happy week
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Interesting topic and reflections on the value of spontaneity. Perhaps spontaneity is the springboard from which inspiration takes flight. Wow! I can’t believe I just said that. Anyway…..I like these photos very much.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Hej Klausbernd! Im Prinzip folge ich Dir – aber es gibt auch das spontane schaffen, wie Hannes wunderbare Bilder zeigen. An meinen Gedichten arbeite ich ebenfalls wenig bis garnichts nach. Es passt oder passt nicht – ab in den Papierkorb .Es kommt auf das Sujet an. In der Gartenkunst z.B. ist es oft nicht möglich nach zu arbeiten. Aus so vielen Gründen. Liebe Grüsse an Alle aus einen im Moment wieder etwas freien LKPG – kein Eis und Schnee – Ruth

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hej, liebe Ruth
      Glaube bloß nicht, dass Dinas Bilder spontan sind. Sie folgen Kompositionsregeln, bestimmten Vorstellungen über Farbharmonien und ästhetischen Vorstellungen. Ok, das ist alles verinnerlicht, aber gewusst. Kandinsky sagte während seiner Bauhauszeit, dass ein Künstler 👨‍🎤 sehr großes Wissen haben müsse, das aber verinnerlicht ist und so sein Schaffen bestimmen sollte.
      Danke 🙏 für deinen Kommentar.
      Oh, wie schade, dass auch du keinen Schnee ❄️ hast. Hier friert es zumindest nachts.
      Liebe ❤️ Grüße aus den Ferien
      The Fab Four of Cley
      💃🚶👭

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jet
      as Kandinsky wrote, first artists have to know and think a lot, second when producing they have forgotten it (but it influences the act of producing subconsciously).
      Thanks for commenting
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Liebe Hanne, lieber Klausbernd und ihr lieben Feen,
    ein sehr interessantes Thema, was ihr heute aufmacht.
    Frei sein —
    Für mich gibt es verschiedene Kategorien in denen Freiheit immer eine andere Bedeutung hat.
    In der Arbeit bedeutet Freiheit für mich, ungeliebte Aufträge ablehnen zu können. In der Kunst bedeutet Freiheit für mich, die Fähigkeit loslassen zu können. In der Familie und Freundeskreis bedeutet Freiheit für mich, so aktzeptiert zu werden, wie man handelt.
    Ich weiss Klausbernd, dass noch eine Antwort zum vorletzten Blogbeitrag von mir ansteht. Sie gärt in meinem Kopf und ich werde sie dir (hoffentlich noch dieses Jahr) per Mail zusenden.
    Liebe Grüße sendet euch aus einem verregneten Berlin
    Susanne

    Liked by 7 people

    • Liebe Susanne
      Die Freiheit loslassen zu können, wovon? Von allem, was im Gedächtnis gespeichert ist und das Bewusstsein prägt? Ich habe gerade in der Antwort vor der hier Kandinsky zitiert, der ja meinte, dass ein Künstler viel wissen müsse, aber dieses Wissen müsse er während des Schaffens vergessen. Es soll aus dem Unbewussten wirken. Ist das dieses Loslassen?
      Mit deiner Antwort zur Post davor, das hat keine Eile – ich bin ja mehr für die Vita Contemplativa 😉
      Liebe Grüße von der Rückreise aus unserem Urlaub
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      Schnell gesprochen:
      Sich vom gewohnten, akademischen, schon gewesenen zu befreien.
      Sich von zu vielem, zu wenigem zu befreien….
      Ich antworte vom Handy vom Athener Flughafen….
      Viele Grüße, Susanne

      Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Susanne
      DANKE – ich denke, Spontaneität bringt das Gewohnte und deswegen Langweilige hervor, durch Reflexion kann Neues entstehen. Das war auch megaschnell geschrieben, da ich nämlich weg muss.
      Liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      Ich dachte es immer genau andersherum aber du hast recht. Spontan schöpft man doch meistens aus seinem Repertoire, aus dem Gewohnten.
      Erst nach langen Denkprozessen kommt das Neue an die Oberfläche. Das Neue dann umzusetzen, also vom Kopf in die Zeichnung oder ins Wort, ist dann nochmal ein sehr anstrengender Vorgang!
      Danke für den Hinweis 😀
      Einen schönen Tag wünscht euch allen in Cley Susanne

      Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Susanne,
      genau das meine ich. Das ist auch beim Schreiben so, die ersten Entwürfe sind nur ein Sprungbrett zu etwas Interessanten, das sich sicher nicht ohne Reflexion einstellt. Sie sind diese “shitty first draft”, von denen Hemingway spricht.
      Hier ist’s jetzt winterlich. Es weht eine steife Brise, bisweilen gibt’s Schneeregenschauer und ungerührt davon fliegen riesige Schwärme von Wildgänsen übers Haus.
      Mit lieben Grüßen nach Berlin
      The Fab Four of Cley
      Dunkel kann ich mich jetzt erinnern, dass doch Heinrich von Kleist in seiner Schrift “Über das Marionettentheater” auf dieses Thema Spontaneität in romantischer Weise eingeht.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      danke für den Hinweis auf Kleist.
      Ich reflektierte gerade sehr unsere Unterhaltung zum Handy und überlege, ob ich dazu verbunden mit der traditionellen Zeichnung ein Thema für meine Promotion entwickeln kann.
      Sobald ich zu einem Ergebnis gekommen bin, werde ich dir per Mail über meine Denkansätze berichten.
      Viele Grüße von einer 💡denkenden Susanne

      Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Susanne,
      ich werde noch mal in Kleist Marionettentheater schauen. Das ist zig Jahre her, dass ich das gelesen habe. Dunkel erinnere ich mich, dass es um Anmut und Bewusstsein geht, wie in der Kunst.
      Hier stürmt es. Es ist fein gemütlich vorm Kamin, gleich lese ich “Pachinko” von der koreanischen Autorin Min Jin Lee weiter, ein Roman, der mich sehr positiv überrascht – immerhin bis S. 100.
      Liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      ich werde mich gleich in das Portrait der frühen Neuzeit stürzen und mein Referat zu Carotos “Knabe mit einer Zeichnung” weiter ausarbeiten. Eine sehr interessante Arbeit.
      Von der Koreanerin Min Jin Lee habe ich noch nichts gehört, ich google mal, worum es in den Roman überhaupt geht.
      Liebe Grüße Susanne

      Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Susanne,
      ich hatte auch noch nie von Min Jin Lee gehört, bevor ich das Buch sah. Mit ihrem anderen Roman “Free Food for Millionaires” war sie einige Zeit in der New York Times Bestsellerliste. Das zumindest las ich auf dem Cover und da es kostenfrei in einer Art Bücherschrank stand, nahm ich es mit. Die Autorin kann ausgesprochen gut in einem klaren Stil beschreiben. Die Kritik beschrieb sie als eine Art Mischung von Dickens und Tolstoi. Ich meine allerdings nicht, dass man sie gelesen haben muss.
      Ich habe übrigens von Caroto auch noch nie gehört. Ich finde es stets spannend, wenn Medien sich selbst zitieren, wie die Zeichnung vom Knaben mit Zeichnung oder Film im Film. Das kann ja als Grundhaltung der Postmoderne gesehen werden. Aber, oh dear, was schwätz ich da, ich habe keine Ahnung …
      Hab ein schönes Wochenende, liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd
      und von dem Rest der Gang natürlich auch

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hier ist es inzwischen Abend geworden – von Min Jin Lee gibt es Pachinko auch als ungekürztes Hörbuch. Ich frage mich bloß, ob mein Englisch dafür gut genug ist.
      Die Zeichnung im Bild ist tatsächlich ein Aspekt des Bildes aber viel mehr geht es um das Decorum – das Schickliche im 16. Jahrhundert. Das Gemälde gilt als die erste Kunstkritik. Wenn du dir neben dem Caroto Leonardos Monalisa anschaust bekommst du eine Vorstellung von dem, was Caroto wollte. Barbara Wittmann bezeichnet das Gemälde als gemalten Witz und drauf werde ich meine Überlegungen aufbauen.
      Einen schönen Abend aus dem stockdusteren Berlin von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Vielen herzlichen Dank, liebe Susanne,
      gemalter Witz – das hört sich spannend an. Das entspricht auch in etwa den barocken Emblemata, eine ähnliche Stilauffassung.
      Pachinko ist durchweg in einem gut lesbaren Englisch geschrieben, aber, wie geschrieben, man muss es nicht gelesen haben. Es erinnerte mich über weite Abschnitte an Ferrante, nur dass hier der Hintergrund der Familiengeschichte exotischer ist, zumindest empfinde ich das als europäischer Leser so.
      Ich werde mir gleich Carotos Bild und die Monolisa nochmal mit deinen Hinweisen im Blick anschauen. Danke!
      Aus dem plötzlich wieder sonnig milden Cley liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd! Der Caroto fällt ja noch in die Renaissance. Ich denke, der Witz entwickelte sich in den Werkstätten, was noch zu beweisen ist. 😜
      Die Ferrante fand ich unterhaltsam und neben den vielen Fachbüchern „nett“ zu lesen.
      Hier in Berlin regnet 🌧 es bei Kälte. Brrrrr
      Ich wünsche euch in Cley eine schöne Vorweihnachtszeit, liebe Grüße von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      witziger Weise gab es das letzte Semester meines Germanistik Studiums eine Vorlesung mit Begleitseminar über den Witz. Das hat mich natürlich interessiert, da ich einige Zeit zuvor Freuds Buch über den Witz und seine Beziehung zum Unbewussten verschlungen hatte. Wir betrachteten eingehend die Barockliteratur, in der Witze, allerdings mehr noch das Rätsel, wesentlich waren. Der Witz ist meines Erachtens ein Spiel mit dem Erwartungshorizont des Rezipienten, er wird verblüfft, da für ihn Nicht-Verbundenes verbunden wird. Aber ich habe keine Ahnung mehr, dieses Seminar liegt zu lange zurück. Und weißt du, was dieser Professor im Semester danach las? Die Linguistik der Klosprüche. Das hätte ich ja gerne gehört, aber da hatte ich schon Arbeit in Finnland.
      Ich finde das übrigens toll, vielen Dank, dass ich durch dich auf Maler komme, von denen ich nie gehört hatte.
      Hier ist es grau und windstill, relativ warm, aber es soll Ende der Woche arktisch werden, meint unser Gärtner.
      Mit lieben Grüßen und gutes Gelingen für deine Arbeit – oder ist sie schon abgeschlossen? –
      Klausbernd 🙂
      Du glaubst es ja kaum, Siri und Selma liegen immer noch als selige Schnarchnasen in ihren Kuschelbettchen.

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      es ist erstaunlich , in welcher Art und Weise der Witz betrachtet werden kann.
      Entweder heute oder nächste Woche Donnerstag werde ich das Referat halten. Je nach dem wie es zeitlich hinkommt. Ich bin vorbereitet 😀. Danach schreibe ich noch eine Hausarbeit dazu. Die letzte vor dem Master.
      Freuds Buch über den Witz interessiert mich genauso wie Bachtins zum Thema lachen.
      Genau, Witze sind für den Kenner, der den Witz versteht und es ist 500 Jahre später nicht einfach den Witz zu erkennen. Aber es macht Spaß, danach zu forschen.
      Viele liebe Grüße aus der über vollen U-Bahn von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Susanne,
      da bist du ja wie eine Detektivin, die das Rätsel des Witzigen erkundet. Das stimmt, man benötigt viel Wissen über die Kultur der Entstehungszeit des Witzes, um seine Konnotationen zu verstehen und damit den Kern des Witzigen.
      Hier herrscht gerade fürchterliches Wetter: Sturm, Schneeregen, da bleibt man eigentlich fein daheim, aber ich muss jetzt mit Siri und Selma einkaufen fahren.
      Liebe Grüße nach Berlin
      Klausbernd, Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen Klausbernd,
      genau diese detektivische Arbeit mag ich an der Kunsthistorik! Dieses zusammenführen von Forschungsergebnissen und bestenfalls daraus auch noch neue Schlussfolgerungen ziehen.
      Hier in Berlin schneit es, so ein dreckiger Schnee, der sofort taut, wenn er den Boden berührt. Ich habe gebe heute einen Zeichenworkshop im Atelier und mache dafür gerade die letzten Handgriffe.
      Ein schönes Wochenende wünscht euch Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      ich finde am Spannendsten am Denken, dass es in geneigten Momenten Ideen zusammenführt, deren Verbindung einen verblüfft. Das macht auch den Kriminalroman so beliebt. Übrigens Freud sah den Psychoanalytiker als Detektiv. Karl Kraus, Feuds Zeitgenosse, schrieb über den Kriminalroman, der für ihn die Literarisierung des Intellektuellen darstellt.
      Also dann vergnügliches intellektuelles Spielen – so wie in Hesses “Glasperlenspiel”?
      Hier scheint die Sonne bei knapp über Null Grad, aber es fühlt sich wie – 5 Grad an. Unser Gärtner spricht von Schneestürmen nächste Woche, was wir aber nicht glauben. Auf jeden Fall wir haben genug Holz und zum Glück auch Zentralheizung, um das zu überstehen. Ein normaler Winter, wie ich ihn aus dem Bergischen Land gewohnt war, ist für den Engländer eine Naturkatastrophe
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom sonnigen Meer, genieße das Wochenende
      Klausbernd
      und natürlich auch wir Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma, die dir feinsten Feenhauch senden

      Liked by 1 person

    • Das stimmt, Klausbernd, ich finde das Recherchieren in der Tat so spannend wie ein Kriminalroman. Gestern habe ich Die Kultur der Renaissance von Jacob Burckhardt für 99 Cent bei Amazon Kindle entdeckt. Ich empfinde das Buch als gelungenen Überblick mit viel Wissenwertem zum weiterforschen. Genau das Richtige für einen kühlen grauen Sonntag. Nachher wollen wir in den alten Lokschuppen Südgelände zum Weihnachtsmarkt. Mal schauen, ob da etwas weihnachtliche Stimmung aufkommt.
      Liebe Grüße von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      Jacob Burckhardt habe ich vor vielen Jahren mit Begeisterung gelesen. Leider, leider kann ich mich aber nicht mehr recht erinnern, was er eigentlich schrieb. Oh dear! 😦
      Dann wünsche ich einen angenehmen Weihnachtsmarktausflug
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Vielleicht willst du ihn ja nochmal lesen, Klausbernd. Steht er noch in den tiefen deiner Regale?
      Ich finde es praktisch, ihn als kindle Ausgabe zu besitzen, so kann ich immer wenn ich Lust habe die Kapitel auf meinem Handy in der U-Bahn lesen.
      Nun beginnt eine neue Woche und Berlin ist schneebedeckt. Wie schön!
      Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      Ja, er steht oben im kleinen Bibliothekszimmer, wo sich Kunst, Märchen und skandinavische Literatur den Raum teilen. Allerdings ist es ja ein Vorteil, den Text auf Kindle zu haben, da man viel schneller etwas finden kann, was man sucht im Text.
      Ohhh, purer Neid, ihr habt Schnee. Hier regnet und stürmt es, keine Aussicht auf Schnee; wir haben + 3 Grad C. Morgen kommt die liebe Dina zurück, sie hatte in Süd Norwegen auch nur Schnee in homöopathischen Mengen, was sie sehr enttäuschte.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom rauen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      schön, dass du weißt, wo deine Bücher stehen. Bei der hohen Anzahl an Büchern ist das eine Leistung!
      Da haben Dina und du heute viel zu quatschen. Ich wünsche euch einen Wiedersehen Tag,
      Liebe Grüße von Susanne

      Liked by 2 people

    • Vielen, herzlichen Dank, liebe Susanne.
      Was für ein toller Wintertag heute, leichter Frost und Sonnenschein. Dina kommt heute Abend; und wir freuen uns schon SEHR.
      Naja, ich weiß meistens, wo meine Bücher stehen, aber leider längst nicht immer.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom sonnigen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Tag ihr wieder vereinten vier!
      Mein Platz für Bücher wird immer geringere. Ich Stapel inzwischen quer auf dem Regal und in zweiter Reihe. Dabei kaufe ich nur noch Fachbücher real. Aber was solls, bisher finde ich immer noch alles wieder.
      Eine schöne Zeit euch von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      ja wir sind froh wieder vereint und sitzen gerade gemütlich vorm offenen Feuer, der Weihnachtsbaum im Rücken ist bereits geschmückt, und Siri und Selma spotteten bereits Geschenkpäckchen darunter. Sie davon abzuhalten, in die Weihnachtspäckchen kleine Gucklöcher zu bohren, war Dompteursarbeit.
      In unserer Bibliothek sah es vor der Ordnung, die wir mit der Aufnahme ins Bibliotheksprogamm verbanden, wie bei dir aus: Bücher in Zweierreihen, Bücher drunter und besonders drüber. Nun gibt es eine logische Ordnung, die das Auffinden zum Kinderspiel werden lässt und falls nicht, hilft das Programm. Aber, wie gesagt, wir haben nicht einmal die Hälfte unseres Bestandes geschafft und das Chaos in den Regalen in der Küche steht als nächstes an (Abteilung Großbritannien), aber nach Neujahr frühestens.
      Auch dir wünschen wir eine wunderschöne Vor-Weihnachtszeit, hab’s schön
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ihr lieben vier im fernen Cley,
      ich sehe euch vor meinem inneren Auge vor den Weihnachtsbaum sitzen.
      Micha und ich haben am Mittwoch den Weihnachtsbaum gekauft und ich werde ihn heute mit Julian, der aus Göttingen zu Besuch ist, schmücken. Ich freue mich darauf.
      Meine Bücher in eine Ordnung bringen steht ganz oben auf meinem Programm 🙂 aber das wird sicher erst nach dem Studium etwas. Mein Referat gestern über den Witz war gelungen und nun kann ich mich am Montag in die Unibibliothek setzen und beginnen daraus meine Hausarbeit zu formulieren. Ich habe gut vorgearbeitet, die Fußnoten stehen schon im langen Referattext und die Literaturliste sieht auch anständig aus.
      Ich wünsche euch viel Spaß beim Sortieren der Abteilung Großbritannien,
      liebe Grüße und eine dicke Umarmung sendet euch Susanne

      Like

    • Liebe Susanne
      da waren wir uns sicher, dass dein Referat über den Witz kein Witz würde. Gratulation für deinen Erfolg! 🙂 🙂
      Jetzt seid ihr wahrscheinlich dabei, euren Weihnachtsbaum zu schmücken. Wir werden heute Plätzchen backen und es uns gemütlich machen, nachdem wir heute Morgen einkaufen waren. Puh, die Geschäfte waren voll wie zur Touristenzeit.
      Sonst gibt es von uns nichts Neues zu berichten, denn wir hocken ja meistens zu Hause, genießen Haus und Hof. Leider ist es wieder sehr mild geworden, eine weiße Weihnachten werden wir uns abschminken können, die haben wir auch nie hier erlebt trotz all des Schnees auf den Weihnachtskarten. Ich wurde gestern zur Beziehung von Weiß, Schnee und Weihnachten ewig lange interviewt für die Wochenendbeilagen einiger Tageszeitungen. Ich hoffe, der Redakteur macht einen schönen Artikel daraus.
      Mit lieben Grüßen, feinstem Feenhauch und big HUGs xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd, liebe Hanne und ihr lieben Feen, heute morgen hat es in Berlin wunderschön weihnachtlich geschneit!
      Leider ist keine einzige weiße Flocke liegengeblieben.
      Ich werde gleich eine Lammkeule in den Ofen schieben, zwischen den ganzen Vögeln dachten wir unseren Adventgästen heute Lamm anzubieten.
      Der Weihnachtsbaum strahlt im Kunstlichtkerzenlicht 😉 und wir decken gleich den Tisch ein.
      Oh, welche Tageszeitungen haben dich den interviewt? Deutsche? Dann können wir den Artikel auch lesen…… oder berichtest du im Blog darüber?
      Wir wünsche euch einen wunderschönen 3. Advent, liebe Grüße auch von Micha sendet euch Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      das hört sich ja voll gemütlich an bei euch. Lammkeule – yummy 😋 Auch wir haben keinen Schnee ❄️ leider!
      Das Interview wird in den Kieler Nachrichten, der größten Tageszeitung in Leipzig und einigen anderen Tageszeitungen erscheinen, wohl auch in kleinen Berliner Zeitungen. Eigentlich sollte ich mich ja mehr darum kümmern, aber ich bin doch pensioniert!
      Gaaanz liebe 💖 Grüße euch beiden von 💃👭🚶⭐️🌟🔥🎄

      Like

    • Liebe Hanne, lieber Klausberd, ihr lieben Feen,
      ich kann ja schauen, ob google deinen Namen in Bezug auf den Artikel ausspuckt 🙂
      Genau, du bist pensioniert, da ist so ein Interview eine nette Unterbrechung des Rentnerdaseins, die aber nicht in Arbeit ausarten sollte 🙂 🙂
      Ich will jetzt in die Uni-Bibliothek und bin schon voller Freude, was ich dort alles zu den Signaturen, die ich herausgesucht habe, lesen kann.
      Liebe Grüße von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      gerade als wir mit riesigem Einkauf nach Hause kamen, lag die Transkription des (freilich sehr gekürzten) Interviews vor, um die Imprimatur zu geben. Ich werde es dir per Mail zusenden.
      Wir hatten einen fein sonnigen Tag, den wir nur leider in Läden verbrachten. Aber gleich wird im Kamin das Feuer angezündet und dann in Ruhe gelesen und gequatscht und, nicht zu vergessen, später leckerst gespeist. Du hast schon recht, einesteils sind solche Interviews eine nette Unterbrechung meines Rentnerdaseins, auf der anderen Seite werde ich fast wöchentlich angefragt und das teilweise von atemberaubend schrecklichen Frauenillustrierten, die du dir sicher nicht anschauen würdest. Solch ein Interview wie das zu Weiß und Weihnachten ist etwas anderes, da es in den Wochenendausgaben größerer Tageszeitungen erscheint. Ansonsten mache ich lieber Radiointerviews, die ist häufig niveauvoller als die print-Interviews.
      Jetzt wird aber nur noch des süßen Müßiggangs gefrönt bis Mitte Januar 🙂 🙂
      Mit gaaanz lieben Grüßen vom Meer an die Spree
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Danke für die Mail mit dem vielen Weiß, Klausbernd, ich habe mich sehr gefreut und schon mit Interesse gelesen. Es wundert mich immer wieder, wieviele Aspekte eine Farbe in sich birgt. Für mich als Künstlerin birgt das Weiß auch immer die Verheißung des Neuen. Das weiße Papier, Leinwand, Holz etc. Weiß beinhaltet eine Fläche, die mit den Sorgen und Nöten oder besser mit dem Glück der ganzen Welt gefüllt werden kann.
      Heute schneit es hier in Berlin wieder, leider bleibt der Schnee nicht liegen. Ich habe mir schon ein weißes 🙂 Blatt auf meinem Arbeitstisch gelegt und beginne heute den Tag mit einer großen Zeichnung. Später gehe ich mit Papa zum Arzt, dann auf den Friedhof und dann machen wir es uns bei ihm gemütlich. Mein Bruder hat den Weihnachtsbaumversand ausprobiert und meinem Vater einen geschmückten Weihnachtsbaum senden lassen. Ich bin schon sehr gespannt, wie ein Ama…..-Baum aussieht.
      Liebe Grüße und einen erholsamen Müßiggang sendet euch Susanne 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne,
      vor vielen Jahren schrieb ich ein Buch “Das Geheimnis der Farbe Weiss”, das gleich in 3 Verlagen herauskam. Während des Schreibens wurde mir auch erst klar, wie viele Aspekte Weiss besitzt und auch wie ideologisch diese Farbe besetzt ist. Unsere Wahrnehmung ist ja von all diesen Aspekten geprägt.
      Wir bekommen heute lieben Besuch und so wird geschnippelt, gekocht und alles fein dekoriert. Wir kochen auch Lammkeule nach einem schwedischen Rezept mit Hasselback-Kartoffeln (zum ersten Mal), die in einem schwedischen Hotel erfunden wurden, mit Lyngonbeeren und norwegischen Käse. Ich habe jetzt schon Hunger. Nun muss ich das Feuer im Kamin anzünden, da wir im Wohnzimmer essen werden.
      Weihnachtsbaumversand – ich wusste gar nicht, dass es so etwas gibt.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom sonnigen Meer
      Klausbernd und der Rest der Gang
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd und der Rest der Gang,
      ihr werdet jetzt sicher gemütlich essen.
      Ich habe mir den Weihnachtsbaum und die Lichter vom Adventkranz angezündet und meine Fachbücher zum Witz liegen um mich und ich werden nun beginnen, das Referat in meine Hausarbeit zu überführen. Um mir über den Aufbau klar zu werden, werde ich ersteinmal die Gliederung ändern und die Einleitung (die ich bestimmt noch einige male ändere) schreiben.
      Solong, Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne
      was ein Tag: Plätzchenbacken, Nachbarn besuchen, Besuch bekommen und ein Streitgespräch über Polarforschung schriftlich führend, habe ich jetzt endlich Zeit für eine Antwort.
      Bei allen größeren Texten fand ich stets die Gliederung das Wesentlichste. Ist die Gliederung klar, kann man ja leicht 10-20 Seiten druckfertig schreiben. Allerdings benötigte ich oft für eine klare Gliederung viele Tage, teilweise Wochen. Ich arbeitete oft mit MindMaps.
      Viel Glück mit deiner Gliederung, Siri und Selma werden dir zuflüsternd helfen.
      Wir wünschen dir frohe Feiertage
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Fab Four of Cley,
      die Wichtigkeit der Gliederung ist mir sehr bewusst. Ich habe den Vorteil, durch meine jahrelange Arbeit als Systemanalytikerin bei der ARD sehr strukturiert zu denken. Da ich schon im Referat die Gliederung immer wieder umgestellt habe und nun nur noch über Kleinigkeiten nachdenken musste, bin ich inzwischen mit der Struktur des Referats zufrieden. Zur Zeit schiebe ich die Definition in die Fußnoten, um den Fluß des Textes nicht zu unterbrechen.
      Gestern waren wir im weihnachtlichen Berlin unterwegs. Die Weihnachtsmärkte bersten über vor Menschen und schon nach dem ersten Glühwein war mir die Menschenmenge zuviel. Wir haben uns im Konzerthaus aus deiner Wahlheimat englische Choräle aus Cambridge vom Kings College angehört. Am meisten haben mit die Soli des Orgelspielers Thomas Trotter beeindruckt. Meine Güte! Er beherrscht sein Instrument virtuos. Das einzige was mitunter beim Konzert fehlte war die Kirche drumherum 😉 Das Konzerthaus selber ist zwar ein gelungener Bau im Stil des Historismus jedoch eben keine Kirche.
      Habt ihr Trotter einmal life erlebt? Genial!
      Nun gehe ich zu meinem letzten Seminar für dieses Jahr an der Uni, das Thema ist Karikatur und Portrai von Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
      Ich wünsche euch einen schönen Vorweihnachtstag, liebe Grüße von Susanne

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Susanne,
      oh dear, wir waren heute einkaufen, da es online zu spät war, um eine Lieferung noch vor Weihnachten zu bekommen. Na das war ein Gewühle. Wir sind froh wieder bei Tee und Mohnstollen zu Hause zu sein.
      Leider haben wir Thomas Trotter noch nicht erlebt. Danke für den Hinweis. Wir werden Augen und Ohren offen halten.
      Hier ist es plötzlich fast frühlingshaft warm geworden, schade, weiße Weihnachten wäre ja toll gewesen, aber das ist hier ein vergeblicher Wunsch.
      Ich werde mir jetzt Gedanken für eine digitale Weihnachtskarte machen, nachdem Dina bereits eines ihrer Fotos ausgesucht hat.
      Wir wünschen euch gemütliche Festtage und senden gaaaanz liebe Grüße und feinsten Feenhauch
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Philosophical Photography. A new genre perhaps? This reminds me of the old debate about photography being art. Dina’s images are usually undeniably artistic, and her later work in post-processing and use of applications and software is little different to a famous painter re-working a portrait, or painting over large sections of a canvas. There have even been cases where those ‘spntaneous’ photographers, famous ones like Henri Cartier Bresson, have been revealed to have set up their spontaneous shots, or ‘decisive moments’. Much of what we have long taken for granted in photography has in fact been an artistic contrivance. From the cannonballs in the Crimean War, to the dead soldiers in the US Civil War and the trenches of WW1, photographers with an ‘artistic eye’ have always been aware of the power of a photographed scene that is what we expected to see, rather than what was actually there.
    Always interesting and thought-provoking KB, and of course, sumptuously illustrated by Dina too.
    Love from Beetley, Pete and Ollie. X

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Pete
      thank you so much for your great commentary.
      And a very warm thank you for your kind words about Dina’s photography.
      What the photographer, like all people, is seeing is the first step away from reality, the photo is the next step and the third step is how the onlookers see it. They never ever see what was actually there as the photographed object.
      PP Philosophical Photography – I really like this idea. Most of the contemporary artist follow a certain theory in their art, they quite often explain (like S. Sonntag and A. Leibovitz).
      We came just back from a happy holiday in the Cotswolds.
      Lots of love from all of us
      The Fab Four of Cley xx

      Liked by 2 people

    • Glad to hear you had a nice break in the Cotswolds. That’s a lovely part of the country.
      You should write the book, “Philosophical Photography”, illustrated by Dina of course!
      Love from Beetley, Pete and Ollie. X

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Pete
      before we have our sweat in the sauna: That’s a good idea, writing philosophical about photography. Not a book, I admit that’s too much work and stress of sponsoring it, but little notes, ideas and ramblings about photography with Dina’s photos would be fun. We already thought about it talking in front of the fire yesterday evening. We will see …
      Have a wonderful evening
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • i like you idea of philosophical photography very much, Pete! A great idea!!
      Sunny greetings to you from Lillehammer. -8° and loads of snow. Would you still wear your short trousers?;-)
      Hjerter

      Liked by 2 people

    • I took them off for winter in the second week of November, Hjerter. I miss them, but it is definitely too cold now. I will look forward to their return, next March. 🙂
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Good morning, my dear friends
    first of all HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Klausbernd and I hope you have a beautiful holiday and wishing you all the best, lots of happiness, health and beauty for the new year.
    Well, spontaneity … In the research about creativity it shows that spontaneous works tend to be conventional. And I experience this as well when I am writing a text spontaneously; without a lot of editing it’s nothing new, a style I already know and a topic about which I have read and I am well informed. The mind is a kind of filter which hopefully blocks out all the conventional elements I automatically use. As in social media like Instagram the mind is not ask for you see thousands of pictures in the same style and with the same motive. I suppose this is a collection of spontaneous produced pictures. A great field to study what spontaneity produdes.
    All art, I would call art, is planned as I know. But Anne Leueen made a good point: ‘Spontaneity is the springboard from which inspiration takes flight.’ I really like this idea 🙂 I teach my students that spontaneity is just the first step to create something special. But if we talk about social media, this is not the place for creating something special or for indidividualty it’s rather a place to conform and serve the expectations of the receiver/visitor.
    All the best and enjoy your holiday, birthday and life
    Annalena xxxx

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks a lot, dear Annalena 🙂 🙂
      I have had a great birthday. We had a little holiday in the Cotswolds and in Broadway, a romantic village there, Hanne and I celebrated cosily.
      Maybe social media are a step towards a new kind of art.
      With lots of love
      The Fab Four of Cley xxxx

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Stunning photos ~ stunning writing. 🙂 Enjoy Otto’s view of photography (and life) greatly. Spontaneity is one of those great flavors of life we can relish in when we have the freedom to do so. It fuels passion, and passion is what keep people moving forward when critics/struggles of life can make it easy for people to be discouraged and quit. Moods can allow us so many different was of being spontaneous ~ sometimes it is recklessly quick/fast and without a care for me, and then other times it is getting so lost in a moment and making it last forever. Passion gives us freedom, and spontaneity is perhaps the fuel behind the passion. Love this philosophical take of yours 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Dalo,
      thanks for liking our philosophical style.
      Yes, we very much enjoy Otto’s view of photography, he is inspiring us a lot.
      Well, the spontaneous – in the end it’s quite subjective if we like it or not and this make us judge. As Eddy wrote in a comment it’s a matter of age. Siri and our Master want to see a statement in an artifact. For Dina and Selma the optical quality, what it looks like, is most important. With other words we expect a certain order. Spontaneity is the opposite, chaos ruling. Well, we think our perception is happy about order and stressed with disorder. But this, of course, has to do with age as well.
      We often forget that order has, as spontaneity, many faces.
      Wishing you a relaxed week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Fab Four of Cley,
    Who would think it possible but that each post is better than the last? The talent incorporated in your family is remarkable and I thank you all for sharing the results.
    If I am asked to pick my favorite of the images, it would have to be the first one, with number 2 being the last one – coming in a very close second!
    In my life, spontaneity has proven be both the best and worst of me, so I’ll refrain from answering there! 🙂
    All the very best to my friends…
    GP Cox

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear GP Cox
      just back from a little holiday we are happily reading your comment.
      Thank you very much. We think that spontaneity in life can help, we need a certain dose of it to survive and being happy. But in art we prefer artifacts that are planned, following an idea we can see. A spontaneous object tends to follow often our internalized pictures, ideas etc. of the media.
      Warm greetings from the cold sea for our friend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  12. What I get out of your outstanding article on spontaneity in writing is that one needs to find the right balance between the two extremes: chaotic spontaneity and excessive, artificial organization of one’s work. I believe that there must be some order or purposeful restraint in one’s writing. Yet, let us never ignore as we grow older and perhaps wiser the times of our youth when spontaneity was the driving force of our creativity. Congratulations on the superb images, which decorated your post!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Peter
      thank you very much for your kind commentary.
      You are absolutely right, I love a certain order in an artifact which confirms my age. This is the usual development. I am a bit ashamed now how I discredited the spontaneous way of the youth, oh dear!
      We wish you a great week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  13. Fotografierblockade gibt es ganz sicher, beladen mit Zweifel an allem und mehr… 🙂 Ein Gefühl dass man sich selber wiederholt… dass die Motivation eigentlich ganz falsch ligt… ein Mühlengefühl… bis man sich zum Schluss ganz festreitet und die quitschende Mühle überhaupt nichts mehr tut.
    Wie man da raus komt? 😀 Tja, bei mir ist das jedesmal anders. Manchmal hilft es um die Zeit zurück zu drehen, ganz alte Fotos aufs Neue zu bearbeiten und irgendwie komt dan der Augenblick dass man einen anderen Weg sieht… Oder einfach eine Weile Verstand auf 0 und drauflos knipsen bis sich ein neues Gefühl einstellt… Vor allem, aber, immer wieder das Gleichgewicht finden zwische ‘was von mir erwartet wird’ und ‘was ich eigentlich selber will’…

    Autsch… ja, ungefähr sowas also… 😀 😀 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    • Das hast du hervorragend ausgedrückt! Vielen Dank, liebe Nil.
      ‘Was wird von mir erwartet’ und ‘was will ich’ muss ich auch als Schreibender jedesmal abwägen und die darin liegende Spannung scheint mir notwendig, ja wesenhaft, für den künstlerischen Prozess zu sein.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von der stürmischen See
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Fabulous images this week, Klaus. Dina is really getting the hang of using her smartphone camera. I need to work on the quality of my mobile night photos and her work is quite inspirational.

    Your discussion about “how free is free” reminds me of an old quote by Robert Anton Wilson: Freedom defined is freedom denied.

    Thank you for the link to Otto’s blog. I like what he is doing and am following him now. I practice spontaneous photography at times as a way of getting a feel for a place or subject. I will try different combos of framing and exposure and then examine them on my phone. I usually delete the bulk of those and then start making photos in a more pre-meditative fashion.

    I do much more post-production editing lately. My go-to software on my iMac is Luminar.

    Happy Weekend to the Fab Four of Cley,
    Ω

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi dear Allan,
      thank you so much for your kind words about my photography, it’s highly appreciated. This time I did not use my iPhone. All photos are taken with my Nikon D800. The iPhone is not so good for evening shots like this or should I rather say, I don’t know how to make nice shots in the dark with my phone. A couple of days ago I made photos of the Radcliffe Camera in Oxford. It was early evening, the sun had long gone done and the Rad cam was quite dark and the result was so so bad, I deleted all the photos. The next morning I went back and made some shots in daylight/rain both with my camera and iPhone, much better! 🙂 I have posted an iPhone shot on Instagram.

      I have no experience with Luminar, but I’ll look it up. At the moment I’m a bit frustrated because the Nik Collection doesn’t work on PS 2018, but somehow I’ll sort it out.

      Happy weekend to you too!

      Dina

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for clearing that up, Dina. Your night shots are great regardless of the platform. These days I don’t get out a lot at night to take photographs. I am settled into my favorite chair with a cat in my lap and the idea of getting up and going out is low on the list of priorities. I just upgraded to an iPhone X and the low-light capabilities of the native camera look very interesting.

      I have no experience with Photoshop, but Luminar can be used alone or with your existing Photoshop plugins. Luminar also has a Windows version for the PC crowd.

      Here is a link: https://macphun.com/luminar
      Ω

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Allan
      Freedom defined is freedom denied, thanks for this quote we like.
      I read all the books of Robert Anton Wilson eagerly. Well, he was a cult author in my youth.
      Have a happy week
      Klausbernd and The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Wonderful photos Dina. Your home town is very pretty. I guess I am mostly a spontaneous photographer. I take my camera out with me all the time (except to the supermarket 🙂 ) never really knowing whether I will use it or not. I keep telling myself to be more planned and take less shots, stick to one genre instead of photographing anything and everything, but I am not very good at listening to myself! Hope you are all having a fabulous holiday and seeing some snow!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jude
      we understand to be spontaneous is best when it is based on your internalized knowledge of photography and art.
      We always discuss this as well, if Dina should stick to one genre. We use to talk about the pictures that Dina takes and not only therefore Dina’s pictures are not spontaneously shot.
      We had a fabulous holiday in the Cotswold, we even were quite lucky with the weather and we love those picturesque villages, we didn’t see one snow flake but white ice in fields in the mornings.
      We wish you a wonderful week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Mir fällt ein Stein vom Herzen, offenbar bin ich doch nicht übergeschnappt: Mir scheint es, als ob das der Gund ist, warum ich zwei Blogs betreibe? Intuitiv. Streng genommen könnte das der Fall sein.
    Ich danke dir für diesen Beitrag und grüße die anderen.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. The great artists followed the rules of their trade strictly, and their spontaneity was an additional touch. Beethoven mastered the rules of harmony and composition. Da Vinci, Shakespeare etc. their spontaneity was the bouquet on top of the package.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Beautiful light and such a feeling of peace. I use my iPhone 5s all the time and love being able to take shots easily, although I’m not thrilled with night shots. Of course, that might be just me not knowing how to use it in those situations. I have so much to learn. I don’t do a lot of post-production and as I only have Picasa, I don’t have as many options as some. Just something else to learn and practice.

    janet

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Spontaneous or planned, a photo shows the photographer’s vision. James Agee said “I know fewer than a dozen alive whose eyes I would trust as I trust my own.” But being shown someone else’s vision–whether true or not–is in itself an experience worth having. That first photo, with the blue sky and the limb crossing it is stunning with the contrasting light below.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Natütrlich ist man nicht frei. Man ist nicht frei von Werbung und sonstigen Strömungen. Wer das glaubt soll seelig sein oder werden. Aber mir fällt ein Stein vom Herzen, offenbar bin ich doch nicht übergeschnappt: Mir scheint es, als ob das der Grund ist, warum ich zwei Blogs betreibe? Intuitiv wenigstens. 🙂
    Streng genommen könnte das der Fall sein.
    Ich danke dir für diesen Beitrag. Da habe ich noch länger was davon.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Jaja….ich finde man sollte sich schon die Mühe machen, dass etwas, was einem selbst “am Herzen liegt” , fasziniert, interessiert, berührt….
    auch verständlich für andere präsentiert wird (falls man es veröffentlichen will)
    Wenn es dann zu nüchtern, sachlich und glatt wirkt, muss man es vielleicht auffrischen…beleben…
    Dagmar meinte gestern beim Stepptanz über sich: Ich bin nicht kreativ! (sie ist eine wundervolle Gartenbauarchitektin…)
    Andere gewinnen Preise für extrem ausgefallene Entwürfe…
    Allerdings hat Dagmar herausgefunden, dass der Entwurf gar nicht realisiert werden kann. Ihr Kommentar: Haben sie schon unsichtbare schwebende Schrauben erfunden, mit denen sie diese hängenden 10 Meter langen Bambusgewächse befestigen werden oder machen sie das dann an Wolken fest?
    ..naja…
    Ich finde Dagmar sehr kreativ!
    Mein Leben ist so lustig! Es wäre doch schade, wenn ich das jetzt zwanghaft aufräumen würde…einerseits.
    Beim Tanzen bist du immer im Fluss und auch wenn du den selben Tanz wieder und wieder tanzt ist es anders.
    Der Tanz zeigt nicht den Tänzer, sondern der Tänzer den Tanz…
    Tolle schrieb: Das Leben ist der Tänzer und du bist der Tanz
    Ich glaube ihr könnt grad machen, was ihr wollt…manche lassen sich “berühren” , manche nicht..manche haben vielleicht nicht mal ein Herz?!

    Beim Tanz kommt ohne Korrekturen nichts Gescheites heraus, aber manchmal muss man auch ganz neue Moves machen, das Hirn freut sich!

    Wundervoller Blogbeitrag!!!!!
    In den Rheinbrücken sind übrigens Würmer…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Pia
      ein aufregender Satz “Das Leben ist der Tänzer, du bist der Tanz” – aber was heißt das denn? Sollte das nur trivial “ich schreibe die Choreographie meines Lebens” heißen? Wir vermuten, da schwingt mehr mit. Wir müssen darüber noch etwas nachdenken.
      Mit lieben Grüßen gerade aus dem Urlaub zurück
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Und? habt ihr schon genug nachgedacht, ich nicht….aber ich wir tanzen ja gerade wieder Hula für das Merry-Christmas-Hula – Special im Kapitol am 23.12. und alle müssen sehr an ihrem liebevollen Ausdruck, ihrer Synchronisation, ihrer Hingabe, ihrer Technik, ihrer Präzession, ihrer Achtsamkeit, ihrer Teamfähigkiet und was weiß ich noch alles arbeiten….es sieht wie immer nur einfach aus….es macht wirklich Freude…
      Herzliche Grüße vom Schillerplatz
      Ohrwurm: Christmas Luau (the Night before Christmas) Warnung, man bekommt sooooo einen Hunger von dem LIed….
      Lot´s of preparation…hopefully we will have sucess…
      Reverance from Pia

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Pia
      wir halten fest die Damen, dass euer Christmas-Hula ein riesiger Erfolg wird.
      Anfang nächster Woche kommt Dina zurück aus Norwegen; dann wird emsig unser Haus geschmückt, vom Feinsten. Besonders Sirilein und Selmachen lieben das.
      Liebe Grüße vom Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley xxx

      Like

  22. Great photos, spontaneously taken. 🙂 I think there is room for both careful planning and spontaneity in art. Blogging I feel is more like journalism, where you want to get it right but don’t have time for numerous rewrites, Both writing and photography are improved by doing lots, I’m convinced, but it helps to have training and a bit of natural talent. I enjoyed the post. –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, dear Curt!
      We feel also that blogging is journalistic. Although we write and rewrite and edit all our texts. As we blog only twice a month we have time to do this.
      I believe in improving by doing as well, but to get to over a certain point in writing as in photography you need a teacher we suppose.
      Have a great week
      cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Agreed on the teacher bit. Although it can be a good book. I have bunches on writing and more than a few on photography. Your blog shows the care you put into each post. Twice a month: That sounds good to me! 🙂 I rarely write a post straight into WordPress, preferring to write and edit each piece first. But two or three times is normally all a post gets. Peggy gets the last shot at what I have written. –Curt

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Curt
      we write our texts in Word (for Mac) first und edit them in this program before we copy it into WordPress. We find it much harder to correct and edit in WordPress than in Word.
      We love to write a special text entertaining and with infos as well, a bit philosophical and there has to be a connection to the photos.
      Thanks and have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Appreciate the detail. I also use MS Word on my MacBook Pro for writing and editing before copying to WordPress. I do find that WP occasionally captures an error I have missed as a final check. –Curt

      Liked by 1 person

  23. An interesting premise this week fab four – quite different than your norm. Loved the photos especially the last. As for spontaneity, I suppose most photography is spontaneous – it’s only in the editing process that we move toward traditional paths.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Tina
      thank you very much for your commentary.
      That’s the disadvantage of phone photography you have tool for expressing your spontaneity and therefore most of the pictures are alike. They are highly influenced by pictures of the media, advertisement etc. – just as spontaneity is.
      Wishing you a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  24. There can be both right? I had also read Otto’s original post. I often take my camera and shoot spontaneously. Some things catch my fancy and I will return later to re-shoot a different way. Some spontaneous shots end up in the trash bin, some distill into something more interesting when edited.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. I think it was Hemingway who came up with the brilliant phrase “shitty first drafts”. It’s so important to silence the ego and just get the ideas out, without worrying if it’s perfect or not. Then the work begins.

    Liked by 2 people

    • All my published books had their beginning in shitty first drafts. It was writing, rewriting, discussions with my editors, agents and publishers and rewriting again afterwards that made them good, in the way that I was proud being their author. The first drafts were conventional and too subjective – interesting from a therapeutic point of view, but far from being art. Some first drafts can block you to find a new idea or way to express yourself because you put so much in it.
      Anyway, thanks for your comment.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Wie immer ein zum Nachdenken anregender Artikel, lieber Klausbernd. Ich stehe dem Spontanen in seiner Fähigkeit, etwas Außergewöhnliches zu schaffen, auch eher skeptisch gegenüber. Es gibt sicherlich diese Momente, in denen tatsächlich alles zusammenkommt, aber sie sind sicherlich auch bei der kreativsten Person nicht so häufig gesät wie uns die Social Media Posting-Frequenz glauben machen will.
    Meine Blogposts entstehen zum Beispiel oft über Monate, wenn nicht gar Jahre hinweg. Ich fahre irgendwohin, denke: „Das ist interessant, muss ich mal mehr drüber lesen.“ Oder umgekehrt, ich lese etwas und das regt mich zu einem Ausflug oder einer Reise an. All die Eindrücke und Informationen gären dann vor sich hin, bis vielleicht auch ein spontanes Ereignis dazu führt, dass alle Puzzleteile plötzlich zusammenfallen und die Idee für den Blogpost daraus entsteht. Liebe Grüße, Peggy
    PS: Dina, die Fotos sind wie immer großartig! Schaffst Du das auch bei diesen Lichtverhältnissen ohne Stativ?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Peggy
      gerade flog ein Schwarm Wildgänse über das Haus und dann wieder die völlige Stille. Hast du bemerkt, ob die völlig andere Umgebung, in der du jetzt lebst, dein Schreiben verändert?
      Nun zu deinem Kommentar. Wir gehen im Grunde genauso vor wie du, da gibt es Gespräche und Ideen meist nachts vorm Kamin. Es wird auf Zettel etwas im haarsträubenden Stil niedergeschrieben, das wird zu einem lesbaren Text gemacht, den dann ein strenges Lektorenauge betrachtet, wonach weiter umgeschrieben wird, bis wir alle zufrieden sind. Keiner unserer Texte hier ist spontan geschrieben. Natürlich inszenieren wir einen Eindruck von Spontaneität, wir bieten fiktive Spontaneität, mit der erst kürzlich Karl Over Knausgård weltberühmt wurde.
      Mit lieben Grüßen aus dem jetzt kalten Norfolk
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  27. However they were created, those are beautiful images! It seems to me that a balance between applied thought and spontaneity would be ideal – there’s no benefit to anyone in being spontaneous in a mindless way, but too much careful planning can blind one to opportunities that present themselves. It’s a little hard to tell which point your’e making this time – but I do love those photos!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Touching poetry is always planned – it’s the style like rhythm, metaphors etc. which touch. And so is Hanne’s photography. It’s fictionalized spontaneity, you make the receiver feel/think that your artifact is a product of spontaneity.
      Thanks and wishing you a great week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  28. hello dina its dennis the vizsla dog hay those spon … spontan … wel ennyway i reely like theez pikchers wot wer tayken on the fly!!! as for editing i do not do mutch editing myself but my dada has ben nown to edit his buks over and over and over agin sumtimes it tayks him yeerz to finish its like he thinks he has all the time in the wurld or sumthing!!! ok bye

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, dear Vizsla,
      yes, our dear Master is the same, we know this very well.
      Thank you so much for liking Dina’s pictures 🙂
      Wishing you a great week with lots of bones
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Liebe Hanne, lieber Klausbernd,
    zuerst einmal ein großes Lob für die Bilder liebe Hanne, wiederum wunderbar von dir festgehalten, mit deinem ganz besonderem Blick! (Und dabie nmoch ganz spontan eingefangen! 😉 Toll! Natürlich würde mich der Text sehr reizen ausführlicher darauf einzugehen. Aber der Zeitmangel verunmöglicht ein solches Unterfangen. Was nicht heißt, dass wir, bei unserem nächsten Besuch, heiß über dieses spannende Theam diskutieren können.
    Ganz, ganz liebe Grüße an Euch beide von dem arbeitsamen Konrad aus Waldshut

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Konrad
      oh du Armer, da musst du emsig arbeiten, wo du doch lieber fotografieren würdest.
      Wir sind aus wunderschönen Ferien zurück, wo Dina den Auslöser nicht schonte.
      Hier hat sich ja gerade eine mich sehr interessierende Diskussion entsponnen, was wir auch mit unserem Artikel bewirken wollten. Darüber können wir gut später noch ausführlich reden. Der Vorteil ist immer, dass sich mein Standpunkt durch die Beantwortung der Kommentare modifiziert, ich Anderes sehe oder auch anders sehe. Mal sehen, wie wir Fab Four das Ganze in einer Woche sehen.
      Mit gaaaaanz leben Grüßen an Astrid und dich
      The Fab Four of Cley xxxx

      Liked by 1 person

    • Das ist ein ausgesprochen feines Lob, über das sich Dina sehr freute 🙂 Sie wird vielleicht noch später selbst antworten, aber zur Zeit ist sie emsig damit beschäftigt, ihren Abflug nach Norwegen diese Woche vorzubereiten. Sie weilt dort für eine Woche.
      Habe herzlichen Dank
      Liebe Grüße vom Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Gerhard,
      habe ganz, ganz herzlichen Dank für deinen Kommentar. Wow. 🙂 Über deine Worte habe ich mich ausserordentlich gefreut.
      Liebe Grüße aus Fredrikstad (wo diese Bilder entstanden sind), mit einem großem Lächeln,
      Dina

      Liked by 2 people

  30. Very interesting topic. I enjoyed reading your thoughts about it. As a French writer I do agree with the editing part. Although some of my best writing have been done spontaneously with almost no editing. I have to admit that does not happen every day. Stunning photos!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for your commentaries.
      All my books, fiction as non-fiction, and my scripts were born from spontaneous ideas and then edited quite a bit. The result of all this editing was me being happy with my text (well, and that it sold well 😉 )
      By the way, I lived in Montreal for 4 years.
      Wishing you a great week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  31. I so much appreciate your posts, and those of Otto, but now and then I remember the tale of the centipede who began worrying which of its feet should go first. Before long, he was immobilized, terrified that he’d put the wrong foot first.

    In a sense, the emptiness of Dina’s photos stands as a metaphor for a happier and more creative caterpillar: emptied of expectation, and free to roam according to its instincts — while perfecting its walking technique on the way!

    Liked by 2 people

    • What a metaphor! We like it. One of the classic German authors Heinrich von Kleist wrote a famous (during his times) text in the same direction “Über das Marionettentheater”.
      We doubt that we reach our instincts with our spontaneity. Or the other way round: Our instincts are polluted with the intake from media and our psychological structure.
      Thanks and have a marvelous week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Bilder sind berauschend schön…doch hat die Vielfalt eher eine Berechtigung, aber auch was die Feen kürzlich sagten zu der neuen Technik…ein Feen-Beitrag in modernerer Form wäre einen Versuch wert. Doch hat alles seine Berechtigung…und man sollte das Handy als Vergleich ruhig probieren, sonst wird man alt und dumm. Es kann eher nur parallel dazu laufen, ersetzen kann es die andere Technik nicht komplett, dazu ist es manchmal zu unbequem bei der Bedienung.
    Cheers an die Ostküste…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Grüße zurück von der kalten Ostküste.
      Ach du lieber Himmel, wenn du wüsstest … Jeder von uns hier ist mit einem iPhone 6s oder 7 ausgestattet (nebst iPad und MacAir) und Siri und Selma wie auch unser Master und Dina lieben ihre Taschentelefone, wenn sie sie auch für völlig Unterschiedliches benutzen. Masterchen hat nur ein- oder zweimal mit seinem iPhone fotografiert, Dina und Selma benutzen es ständig dafür und Siri ist ein Google-Freak, der Wikipedia ständig belästigt. Vielleicht gerade wegen dieser ständigen Benutzung sehen wir den Einfluss des Taschentelefons auf unsere Sichtweise und Urteilskraft.
      Was wäre denn ein Feen-Beitrag in moderner Form, fragen Siri und Selma.
      Cheers nach Germany
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  33. I agree. While I always have my Nikon at the ready, there have been many more spontaneously lively photos taken with my phone camera, some of which people thought were taken by “the big dog”camera. Without having to fuss over settings and light, it is easier to jump on a photo opportunity. Night shots are not so good with the phone but macro tends to be wonderful. Great post!

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Dear friends,
    It took a long time to read my way down to the end of the comments, phew. 😉 I didn’t want to miss any response in this interesting discussion! The more I read, the more I opened up to the various interpretations of being free or not free and spontaneous.
    I’m not a photographer, but I have a camera (including heavy gear) and I have a smartphone. For me, the great aspect about leaving my camera + extra equipment behind and only use my phone, is that it fuels my creativity. A lack of resources always causes the brain to think in different ways.
    When I just carry the minimum, like a point and shoot camera or my phone, I find myself shooting more. Like Dina pointed out when she wanted try iphonography, it takes you/me away from the “if I just had this lens I’d shoot that” mentality.
    Very enjoyable narrative with Dina’s stunning captures from Fredrikstad. (Congratulations on Fredrikstads 450 years jubilee! :-))
    Good evening and best wishes from Weimar,
    Per Magnus xo

    Liked by 2 people

    • Our dear friend Per Magnus
      answering the comments and contemplating answers we changed our mind about iPhone photography. We can well understand that for practical reasons it’s easier to carry an iPhone than camera equipment. And, of course, you shoot more pictures. Here our critique starts, you are tempted just shoot pictures without thinking about if I really want this picture. That’s the source of this amazing flood of pictures nobody really wants to see.
      But, of course, everything has two sides: phone-photography is ideal for experimenting and for Street Photography. The quality and the possibilities in post-postproduction are amazing.
      We wish you and your son a great weekend, warm greetings to you and Goethe
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good afternoon, dear Brenda,
      the blue hour is the time of the fading light before darkness. There is still light but not much left.
      We wish you a wonderful weekend and thank you
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ah, that is a lovely expression. I’m happy to hear another phrase for the gloaming and twilight. Such of time of mystery and possibility. Your pictures are lovely. I never get good pictures at that hour. You have a wonderful weekend, too!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Daer Brenda
      we will tell Dina to write you her tricks how to go about with low light photogaphy. She does it with her iPhone but mostly with her professional Nikon camera.
      Dina is in Norway right now for a week. When she’s back she will tell you, we suppose.
      With lots of love from the Norfolk coast xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • The blue hour (after the sun has gone down) is one the favourite time for photography in the North. This was done with the Nikon D800, manual settings, handheld, high ISO, medium slow shutter speed. It was the last day of November and pretty cold. I always try to steady my hands (and keep them warm in between 😉 As you can see from the first to the last image, this very special blue light is soon gone.
      Thank you very much for the interest in our work, Brenda. This makes blogging worthwhile! 🙂
      Best regards from Fredrikstad, Dina x

      Liked by 2 people

  35. Hallo Hanne, Hallo Klausbernd,
    jetzt möchte ich als ständiger (heimlicher) Mitleser und Bewunderer eurer Motive auch mal etwas schreiben :Bei mir gibt es das gar nicht spontane Fotografieren, im Job als Berufsfotograf wo alles bis ins letzte durchgeplant ist , kaum Freiraum herrscht und nichts schiefgehen darf…trotzdem muss es supergut werden im Sinne des Kunden. Dann gibt es noch das mässig spontane Fotografieren mit dem ich mich von dem ganzen Berufskram wieder versuche zu lösen…dann fahre ich mit dem Auto durch die Gegend und wenn mir was auffällt springe ich raus , und fotografiere, allerdings mit meiner Berufskamera, nicht mit dem Handy…Interessanterweise gibt es nun Querbeziehungen, ich setzte für beide Bereiche meine Lieblingsobjektive ein, bevorzuge dieselbe Gestaltung und denselben Farblook…man kann eben spontan nicht von dem Gelernten und für gut Befundenem lassen( von wegen die Gedanken sind frei, je länger man dabei ist um so weniger sind sie das) und ja, es gibt eine Fotoblockade…bei vielen Berufsfotografen so nach 10-15 Jahren, man denkt man kann alles, hat alles probiert und gesehen aber in Wirklichkeit ist man stehengeblieben…so sehen die Fotos dann auch aus, wie unter Zwang gemacht. Ich habe damals ein Jahr Pause vom Beruf gemacht und mich nur freien Projekten gewidmet und viel bei der Malerei und der Illustration geschaut…dann klappte es wieder mit meinen Bildern (zumindestens mir gefielen sie wieder)
    Lieber Gruss aus Hamburg von Jürgen

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Jürgen
      habe herzlichen Dank für deinen ausführlichen Kommentar, der genau das beschreibt, was wir meinen, dass nämlich die sogenannte Spontaneität einem gerade am Gewohnten festhalten lässt. Diese Hoffnung, dass sie Neues, Genuines hervorbringt, ist von der Romantik und ihrem Geniekult geprägt (was freilich vor der Verpestung unserer Welt mit den Massenmedien war).
      Auch als Autor benötigt man unbedingt seine Auszeiten. Nichts ist wichtiger, als einen kritischen Abstand zu seinen Artefakten zu bekommen. Unser Masterchen hat dann auch stets die Länder gewechselt, da die Umgebung oft mit konservativer Zähigkeit die Gedanken und den Stil festhält.
      Mit herzlichen Grüßen ins schöne Hamburg
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  36. I’ve taken tens of thousands of photographs in recent years, so one challenge for me is to avoid falling into a rut and repeating myself. Each of us is who we are, however, and some parts of ourselves inevitably end up in our pictures.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Steve
      routine is a problem for every photographer. Repeating is easily done and one isn’t aware of it quite often.
      Our pictures are a document of our perception that governs our self.
      Thanks and happy Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Klausbernd,
      … “Our pictures are a document of our perception that governs our self.” It’s a true joy to read your thoughts and comments. This was another gem!
      Wishing you a lovely Sunday.
      I’m in Lillehammer visiting friends, we have loads of snow, it’s cold and sunny, like a winter wonderland.
      Hugs, Hjerter ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Hjerter
      I am blushing, wow, thanks a lot for your praise. I am (nearly) speechless.
      I envy you for being in winter’s wonderland. Here it’s quite warm and grey as grey can be.
      Love and Hugs
      Klausbernd
      and the rest of our gang xxx

      Like

  37. When I first started to read this post I thought, now wait, I do spontaneously take photos. I just go with the camera and what takes my fancy gets the shot. But then as I continued to read, it is true, most of my photos are improved post-produced. Most, but there are a few that stand as they are. Which is incredible considering the typically dreary English days!
    Like the post.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. I am just a little late to the discussion but I have read your post over several times. Photos are ubiquitous in our digital world and becoming a way to discuss ideas without the use of words. It is also a way to provide context to our lives to be recalled at a later date. I value the photos with my father, and even smile at the memory of his ability to seize the day. He was the one who taught me to be spontaneous, to give a thought relevance, to embrace uncertainly, and move with the motion of time. Going back to photography – I believe it is possible to understand the reasons behind why a photo is taken and reflect upon the message that is being conveyed. Photography is the art of symbols – a rose, a sunset, a rainbow, a glass of water, apple pie, birds in flights, a cup of coffee, sailboat, iceberg – the list goes on. Thank you for giving joy to our community. Much love and many hugs coming to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Clanmother Rebecca
      thanks for your commentary 🙂 🙂
      Linguists see a tendency that our communication is in in a period of changing from an overdetermination of verbal communication to an iconographic communication. If we look at the language of pictures we see it’s not that different from verbal languages with a dictionary of symbols and a grammar. But the communication with simple symbolic pictures like the emoys is faster.
      We don’t like that people hardly differentiate between their personal pictures (you wrote about) and picture that are of interest for the public. We drown in pictures which don’t mean anything to us and which repeat and repeat the same motives and structures. In social media specialized in iconographic communication like Instagram there is hardly any reflection to be found.
      Anyway, maybe we are old fashioned or too intellectual but we miss something in the communication with pictures only. We love blogging where iconographic and verbal communication is balanced.
      We wish you a happy week
      Love and hugs xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • I agree wholeheartedly – without verbal interaction, photos – even the most beautiful – do not reach their full potential. I love how you intertwine the narrative with Dina’s amazing photography. Many hugs coming back from early morning Vancouver – the sun has reappeared.

      Liked by 1 person

    • 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
      We are just enjoying our evening drinks – cheers!
      Thank you very much for liking our text-picture-combination. This is why we like blogging. It’s an ideal way of bringing text and picture together as it was in the Middle Ages.
      We wish our dear friend in Vancouver a great day
      HUGS xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  39. A fascinating topic that has left me reflecting. I think over time I have been less spntaneious with taking photos and yet sometimes once home from a trip there are unexpected surprises. Photos that weren’t planned sometimes turn out to be the best of the bunch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sue
      we have to differentiate if a picture is meaningful for us or a general public. Spontaneously taken pictures can be perfect for street photogaphy and for private pictures but I doubt that they are interesting if we look at them as art. But we admit we are a bit skeptical concerning iconographic communication.
      Thanks for your Commentary. Wishing you a great week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  40. I felt like asking ‘Define Spontaneous – Define Interesting’ 😉

    Apart from those taking photographs of friends in a social context I doubt that many of us take our photographs in a manner that is truly spontaneous. There is always an element of pre-planning even if it’s only along the lines of ‘I think I’ll go to Camden Market today and see what candid photographs I can get’. The photographer has already predetermined what they intend to get out of their expedition. Whether lady luck will present them with some good opportunities to capture what they seek and whether they will actually capture the opportunity when it presents itself is, well – down to Lady Luck and a degree of skill. Sometimes Luck is all you have when you’re caught with the wrong settings and a fleeting moment to catch something of the scene that unfolds – that is as close to spontaneity as I think it gets. And then you are probably going to need all your photoshop skills to turn out an end product.

    It’s ironic that going out to capture the ordinary like a street scene or, in my case, a transport scene totally lacks spontaneity because it is entirely pre-planned (I even have the railway working timetable with me for train photography!). Yet when time moves on such photos have the details that are ‘interesting’ as we look back at our past. The historical relevance of our non-spontaneous works should not be underestimated.

    Of course, people like Ansel Adams pre-planned all their work – they had to. And yet they were reliant upon the spontaneity of nature for the final results that we all admire today. Maybe that’s where the true spontaneity of photographic art lies – back with Lady Luck, the Weather Gods and a great deal of patience 🙂

    Fascinating article as ever – guaranteed to get my thoughts churning 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, thanks a lot for your great commentary 🙂 🙂
      In a way we are never spontaneous because we are influenced by all this media and advertising pictures. The zeitgeist influences what we see and photograph. But, of course, you are right, it depends how to define spontaneity. A very soft definition would be, spontaneous is everything that isn’t planned. But of course we plan subconsciously. Seeing it like this there is no spontaneity possible. Every photographer follows concepts but a the really good ones know about it and are able to change it (slightly).
      Let’s express it like this: Dina’s photos are spontaneously planned 😉 😉
      Thanks again and wishing you a great pre-Christmas time
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, Dina agrees. She is always keen photographing at the blue hour.
      When we were children it was the cosy time when stories were read to us. We loved it.
      Wishing you all the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  41. Thanks for an interesting discussion about being free and spontaneous in the creative process, more specifically photography. Of course, using words like that are bound to raise a discussion, particularly the word free. Because, indeed, what is really free? Can we ever be completely free? Referring to the discussion about photography, we always carry what we have done and seen in the past with us. And it will influence whatever we do in the presence. Even a Lee Friedlander approach where the camera is used without looking through the viewfinder will not be able to be free of previous experiences.

    I still think there is a difference in shooting with a plan and shooting freely as I described in my post, even if it’s not completely free or even close to being free. For me it’s a way to break out of conventions that I have already established through my photography. When I plan, I know what I get. When I shoot more spontaneously, I don’t, even if it’s not freely in am more philosophical sense.

    I don’t think one is better than the other. The spontaneous approach may not produce perfect photos, but for exactly that reason, they may be more alive and capture some of life’s unplanned moments better than a planned photograph. On the other hand, a planned photograph, may be more classical, have more visual depth and capture a stronger narrative. In documentary photography, the approach will mostly have to be spontaneous. It’s like a soccer game, where you bring rules and tactics with you into play, but the beauty is still in the spontaneous interaction between two players who don’t know exactly what each will do. In a typical studio approach everything will be much more planned and thus in a sense more “perfect”.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good evening, dear Otto
      thanks a lot for this summary of the discussion about “free” on your blog and here 🙂 🙂 You inspired us to write this blog post, thank you! We choose a more philosophical approach, as the writers on our blog – Klausbernd and Siri – are no photographers.
      What we think: photographers should analyze their free or spontaneous photography, looking for recurrent structures and then try to try something different. But, of course, as you say, it always matters what you want to use your photos for. Street Photography f.e. has to be more or less “free” which is the charm of it. And snapshots are kind of free by definition. But if one would like to publish a picture, the “free” picture is often too subjective, it carries to many subjective connotations which are not interesting for an outsider. Sorry to say that, but as no-photographers we quite often feel overwhelmed having the feeling the world is polluted with pictures. If we look at pictures we don’t want to see what we have seen thousand times before but something new, something that’s worth looking at. We suppose to produce a picture worth looking at needs an intellectual approach, a certain planning.
      Thank you for all the impulses you give and your differentiated comment we really appreciate.
      By the way we are thinking of changing our blog. Our spontaneous “free” idea is to make our blog more specific and we would like to reflect much more the world of pictures. But we are not sure if this is only of interest for too small a group of recipients. May we ask you what do you think about such a plan? We have nothing decided yet but we want to blog in a new way we are looking for.
      Have a happy pre-Christmas-time
      Klausbernd
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I think this is a great discussion. So thank you for taking the initiative. And, may I add; likewise, your posts always inspire me, too. Your philosophical approach gives a different perspective to many of the issues I ponder about myself.

      When it comes to photography, our approach is a bit different. Like you, I believe that photographers should always analyze their result, whether spontaneous or planned, for elements that may be used either differently or in similar ways in future shoots. However, I do believe the free and spontaneous approach has a value of its own. It brings more life and an element of surprise into a photo that can make it much more interesting that anything a photographer can plan. Not only street photography. I often find planned photographs can be more boring and less fresh.

      I do agree with you that there are too many photos surrounding us and “attacking” our senses that has nothing to say, and do, as you write, pollute the world. That is the nature of, among things, social media. Included, of course, are ads and other PR images that are more likely planned than spontaneous. I don’t think it’s the subjective expression that per say is the problem, at least not to me. After all, is it impossible to not be subjective (which of course, is a whole different discussion).

      Personally, I like the idea you outline for your “new” blog. You surely would lose some readers, but on the other hand find new, too. As part of what we agree upon, I believe, pictures are taking a bigger and bigger space of most people’s life, so I think such a new approach to your blogging would both attract more people but also be a good correction to much of the superficiality and thoughtlessness that is associated with today’s photography.

      I want to wish all of you a happy holiday season, too.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Otto,
      thank you very much for your detailed answer we VERY MUCH appreciate.
      Well, we try to discuss topics (spontaneously – more or less) without having the answer and we notice that our view is always changing reading and answering the comments. We now see that unplanned photography can provide the photographer with new ideas, but to our understanding that’s not the end of it. These unplanned photos becoming “great” photos only if the photographer learns from their analysis how to plan photos differently in the future. Well, that is our idea when we talk to Dina about her photography and speak about her pictures. But, of course, we may have a professional deformation as our dear Master was a specialist for the linguistics of symbols, he taught this subject and writing books about it. We find this meeting of practical photography (Dina and Selma) and philosophical reflections (Klausbernd and Siri) interesting and inspiring and hope it will inspire others too.
      As communication shifts more and more from the verbal to an iconographic mode we find it necessary to reflect the language and grammar of pictures as we it was done hundreds of years with the verbal language when it was the main mode of communication. We tend to see as an ideal the illuminated manuscripts of the early and high Middle Ages, when the illumination of the book was as important as the text.
      We wish you a happy holiday season
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  42. I missed this one! Where was I? 😦 The mystery and excitement of night time photography is here in all its glory. 🙂 🙂 I know you will be approaching Christmas peacefully. Much love to you all at this special time of year.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, isn’t it?!
      Thank you very much, dear Marielou 🙂 🙂
      We wish you a happy Christmas time and thank you very much for visiting our blog regularly. We very much appreciate it.
      With love from the little village next the big sea
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  43. Interesting post. I’m not sure this is exactly the same thing, but I remember a poet (a serious one–I’m not talking about someone who just writes in short lines) talking about the occasional poem that seems to write itself. She saw it as a result of the work she did on all those poems she had to fight for–the work going underground every so often. It seemed spontaneous, but only if you don’t look at the whole picture.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Ellen
      We never ever are a kind of tabula rasa. We absolutely agree, every perception and every creative process is never naive. It’s naive to think that it is. We suppose it actually doesn’t matter if we write or take photographs.
      We wish you a happy holiday season and a healthy New Year
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  44. Beautiful photography, and a very interesting discussion which I came to out of curiosity and without any expectations. In my opinion, art can be produced either with planning or spontaneously, and it’s usually very difficult to tell the difference. The true artist is usually the master of his craft. That is, he knows well how to use his tools, and how to elicit his feelings or thoughts included in his appreciation of his subject. Once the artist has reached the mastery of his tools and techniques, he may still be spontaneous. Just as a person driving a car (or pedaling on a bicycle), may spontaneously take advantage of an unexpected alleyway without directing much attention to the demands of his vehicle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good morning, dear Shimon,
      we agree that a master artist can produce great art quite spontaneously. But what means spontaneity in this case? We suppose he or she has internalised all the rules and tricks that make an artefact to a great aesthetical object. It’s years of reflecting to enable him or her to be ‘spontaneously’. In a way, it’s like driving first you have to internalise how to drive and the rules of traffic and afterwards you just do it without thinking.
      Thank you very much for commenting and wishing you an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: