Pictures of a Lockdown

Pandemics always existed but we were never prepared.
Here you see some impressions from our remote little village next to the big sea during the lockdown.
Lockdown means a deserted beach and no holidaymakers. Some say “heavenly! Don’t let us screw this up.” 

Pandemien gab es schon immer, vorbereitet war man nie. Hier ein paar Impressionen von unserem kleinen Dorf am großen Meer während der Ausgangssperre.
Ausgangssperre bedeutet ein angenehm leerer Strand. So mancher sagt “himmlisch! Lasst uns das nicht vermasseln.

 – And suddenly I looked into her eyes, deep into the emerald green, my heart fluttered, I felt a connection, something deeper, something magical, I was transported to another place and I thought, blimey these binoculars are brilliant.

Nature and some of our neighbours like this quiet when the coast road and coast path are tranquil, some say “like before the war“. 

Die Natur und einige unserer Mitbewohner finden diese Ruhe höchst angenehm. Die Küstenstraße und der Küstenweg sind so ruhig wie es wohl vorm Krieg gewesen ist.

Strictly no parking is the new normal. Nobody should dare to disturb the sea and our idyll.

Damit ja keiner das Meer und unsere Idylle stört, sind Parkmöglichkeiten unterbunden und Zugangsstraße zum Meer abgesperrt. So lässt man selbst das Meer in Ruhe.

The view of the famous Cley Mill is not cluttered with cars and photographing people.

Endlich kann man die berühmte Cley-Mühle ohne fotografierende Menschen und Autos bewundern.

The nature reserve is reserved for the birds (and cattle). They say “thank you” happily chirping.

Am meisten freuen sich die Vögel über die Ausgangssperre. Mit fröhlichem Gezwitschern danken sie uns.

When you go for a daily exercise walk, you meet key workers and friendly locals. In the upper row, you see the people who care for our physical well-being. In the row underneath there is the local pub not being allowed to care for our well-being.

Wenn wir durchs Dorf schlendern, treffen wir freundliche Einheimische und diejenigen, die für unser leibliches Wohlergehen sorgen, die ihr in der oberen Reihe seht. Darunter seht ihr den Pub, der nicht für unser leibliches Wohl sorgen darf.

 

We even had time to clean our terrace with a pressure cleaner creating work for days removing sand and dust from windows, walls and plants. 

Wir hatten sogar Zeit zum Säubern unserer Terrasse mit einem Hochdruckreiniger und schafften so Arbeit für viele Tage, um den aufgeflogenen Sand und Staub von Fenstern, Wänden und Pflanzen zu entfernen.

 

Finally, Dina had time to sort out her photo archive and totally forget what’s cooking. In the end, the pea soup was only good for a Twirl 😉

Endlich fand Dina Zeit unser Fotoarchiv zu ordnen, wobei sie völlig die Zeit vergaß. So war die Erbsensuppe nur noch geeignet für ein verwirbeltes Bild 😉

 

So it is, well, it’s quite bearable. Klausbernd wrote another report about the lockdown in our village for the blog of Sue and Dave Slaght, Travel tales of Lifeand you’ll find some reflections about “Splendid Isolation” on his old blog.
Soon this all will come to an end, the traffic will recapture the coast road, the terrace will get dirty but we’ll get a drink in the pub for comfort again.

So ergeht es uns zur Zeit, ehrlich gesagt, ganz erträglich. Einen weiteren Bericht über die Ausgangssperre in unserem Dorf schrieb Klausbernd für den Blog von Sue and Dave Slaght und ihr findet ein paar Überlegungen zur “Splendid Isolation” auf seinen alten Blog.
Nun wird bald alles wieder aufgehoben, der Verkehr wird die Küstenstraße von den Widtieren zurückerobern, die Terrasse wird verdrecken, aber zum Trost wird es wieder ein Bier im Pub geben.

Stay healthy, happy and away from people
Bleibt gesund, munter und fern von Leuten

The Fab Four of Cley
💃👭🚶‍♂️

 

 

© Text and illustrations, Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar, Cley next the Sea, 2020

 

 

203 thoughts

  1. Dear friends,
    great to see such historic images of a wonderful place I only know with quite a busy coast road, many bird watcher and holiday makers. I’m sure, on one hand, you are thrilled to have it to yourselves. Norway is slowly opening up again and so is Germany.

    In Germany, as I have heard, they were trying to prepare for this crisis by stocking up with sausage and cheese. That’s the Wurst Käse scenario. 😉

    Take care and make the most and best of the present times. We’ll talk soon!

    Klem
    Per Magnus x

    Liked by 9 people

    • Our dear friend GREAT, LOL.
      Here they speak about opening up again as well, but as we have the incapable Boris England is hit much harder than the rest of Europe. England is more like a third world country health-system-wise and it doesn’t help to praise the workers in the hospitals as heroes. If a country needs heroes obviously something has gone drastically wrong. Nevertheless, these workers in hospitals and surgeries are doing an amazing job.
      We don’t mind the lockdown that much. It’s business as usual for us. But some people are getting out of their wits.
      Keep well and happy
      KLEM
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  2. Here we start week 10 and a few changes our dogs can now run free again and some parks open outside of the city…so strange for nature to be closed…I’m grateful it is spring and we have a yard and garden to play…be well 💪☀️it’s will pass too…it’s interesting to see other places 🤓 appreciated The Fab Four of Cley ~ smiles and joy Hedy 🙋‍♀️

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good afternoon, dear Hedy,
      wow, it’s week 10 already! It didn’t seem that long to us. But the lockdown makes time 🕰 in a way irrelevant, we don’t often know which day we have.
      Indeed, we are very lucky that we have such brilliant weather 🌞. We are out in our garden 🌷🌹🥀🌺🌸🌼🌻 and have a little stroll to the beach 🌊🌊 or through our village every day. We are that often outside as we have hardly ever been in any other spring.
      Thank you very much 🙏🙏 for commenting.
      Stay healthy, happy and away from people
      The Fab Four of Cley
      💃👭🚶‍♂️

      Like

  3. Moving chronicle of the time of the coronavirus. Our staying put has certainly been a boon to wildlife and to the planet. But, oh the suffering and death. I sure wish we could control our appetites without having the foot of the pandemic on our necks.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. As our lives came to a rather sudden halt, the extra time to enjoy our own local beauty and get tasks done is a positive in a challenging time. With many thanks for the contribution to our article which has now been published. Wishing you both good health in your quiet for now paradise.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Sue,
      you are very welcome. Our dear Master felt honoured that you published his report of a crisis on your blog.
      We are having a walk every day enjoying our nature and we are so lucky having such a great weather for weeks now. And we have time for contemplating, writing, taking and editing pictures. That we have plenty of time for everything is really an improvement in the quality of our life.
      We wish you and Dave all the best. Stay safe and well
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Good afternoon, dear Fraggle,
      when we moved to Norfolk about 40 years ago it was the quiet end of the world like it is now. This situation makes us aware of what we have lost.
      Where did you live in Norfolk?
      Thanks, wishing you health and happiness
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Coltishall is lovely. Lots of second hand books in the church and books are a known magnet for us. Supposedly it also has the best Fish’n’Chips in Norfolk, but we don’t know anything about that. 😉 We have paid “The Rising Sun” on the river Bure many visits though. They have a great variety of real ales and the location is great for watching the boating people. Did you do a lot a boating in your free time, outside the peek season?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Not really, more sitting in the pub garden watching them go by! Though I have a few pictures of Mum, me and my little boy driving a little motor boat up one of the broads on a day trip. I know The Rising Sun 😊

  5. Wonderful scenes around your village. I have actually seen Cley beach car park empty when we stayed in the windmill one January and got snowed in. I walked to the beach and it was absolutely deserted (and freezing cold, even my lips were numb). And the roads were empty too. But it must be lovely to wander in the sunshine and the warmth. I can understand how much you are enjoying it. The burnt peas made me laugh! I sometimes forget about things I have put on to cook when disappearing into the garden for 10 minutes! Easily done.😂 And jet washes create a lot of mess! I resorted to ‘painting’ my patio with Algon organic path cleaner – I used a watering can and then a soft brush to sweep it all over the paving stones. A lot less mess than the jet wash, which left me cold and wet and mud all over the conservatory windows!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Jude,
      we remember this winter as well when Cley was snowed in. That was great too. We all moved together and shared food and fuel. Actually, now we move closer again although we need this distance of 2 meters.
      Yes, we decided we use this path cleaner next time as well. We actually heard that one can even seal these slabs and then one can easily clean them.
      You wouldn’t believe how much such burned peas stink, unbelievable. The black pot with the black peas is standing outside for more than a week now. If we come near it still stinks horribly. Siri and Selma 👭 are speaking of stinkpeas (they explain it’s like chickpeas).
      Keep well and safe.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • We’re definitely getting rid of the burned pan. I just refused to let go of it until I had made some photos. The sun was annoyingly harsh the whole week. Now the pan is resting together with other items and bigger waste bags from the garden, waiting for the recycling centres to re-open. Do you take your garden waste to a recycling centre or do you burn what you don’t compost? We had to rethink and do things differently in this respect for the last weeks and it works quite well. The first thing I’m buying when the shops open again are some good pans. 🙂

      Like

    • I pay for a garden waste collection as it is cheaper than me going to the recycling centre, plus I don’t have to lift any heavy bags. Always a bonus with my dodgy back 😒

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jude,
      we were thinking about paying for a brown bin but we usually have that much garden waste that a bin wouldn’t save us a drive to the recycling centre. We compost a lot, now much more than before.
      Keep safe
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Sehr eindrucksvolle Aufnahmen und richtig schön so viel von der Umgebung in Cley zu sehen. Covid 19 wird ernst genommen und das ist wichtig.

    “Die Lage ist ernst. Nehmen Sie sie auch ernst.” Angela Merkel.

    Jetzt können wir, hoffentlich, bald alle ausatmen und zu einem neuen Alltag zurückkehren.
    Liebe Grüße aus Plön,
    Anne

    Liked by 6 people

    • Liebe Anne,
      du wohnst in Plön. Witzig, Masterchen wohnte kurze Zeit wärend seiner Hippiezeit auf Gut Horst an der B404 unweit von Plön, und Dina hat dort als Gemeindeschwester gearbeitet. Aber damals kannten die beiden sich noch nicht,
      Ja, soweit wir es mitbekommen, wird von allen hier der Virus ernst genommen. Man muss sagen, wir haben es ja gut, hier in der Natur und wo die meisten große Gärten haben, sind die Einschränkungen leicht zu ertragen.
      Bleib gesund und munter
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Ja, liebe Süßkaffeetante 😉
      das finden wir auch. Vor zehn Jahren machten wir ‘mal in Hamburg Urlaub und da fuhren auch wieder nach Plön. Es ist echt immer noch schön dort, meinten wir alle vier.
      Halte dich gesund und von Leuten fern
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Mein Einsatzgebiet damals war in Preetz und die Umgebung, ca 20 km Umkreis. Eine richtig tolle Landschaft. Noch nie hatte ich so große Felder gesehen, so schöne Sonnenaufgänge auf dem Weg zu Arbeit erlebt.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. It was very interesting to look at the images showing one positive effect of the pandemic on nature and the environment. Here in our remote area of Canada we notice very little difference as there are generally very few people at our lakeshore at this time of the year. We follow the orders of the health departments and keep our distance when we meet somebody. But in a sense nothing has changed very much except the horrible news that dominate the media these days.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Peter,
      in comparison to the cities and towns in the UK, we are quite privileged in our part of England that some describe as out in the sticks. Actually, it seems to be similar to your part of the world. Our life hasn’t changed much. And we have to admit, most of what has changed changed for the better.
      In a lot of European countries, the news are getting more and more hopeful and positive again. Especially, Germany is coping very well whereas the UK with this stupid Boris is the country doing worst in Europe and this is reflected in the media too.
      Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I absolutely loved looking at Cley and you and your little mess. LOL reading the jokes you had tucked away, brilliant! 🙂 🙂
    But, oh no, you shouldn’t use a high-pressure washer on the slaps!! Seriously, I wouldn’t think you had a machine like this?
    Thank you so much for bringing me some sunshine on this grey day. Hope to see you all in Norway at the end of the year.
    Klem
    Hjerter ❤

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Hjerter,
      you are right, we don’t have a high-pressure washer. Our gardener lent it to us, actually, he started cleaning the slabs with this machine and then our Master took over. But we decided never to use this machine again.
      We would love to visit you in Norway and then driving the Atlantic road. But we have to save up to be able to afford Norway. Well, it helps that we can’t spend money right now.
      Keep well
      KLEM
      ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ich liebe die Ruhe, und das Leere. Hier in London fahren schon wieder sehr viele Autos. Die ersten 3 Wochen Lockdown war “Bliss”. Nun achten viele schon nicht mehr so darauf. Es ist schoen zuhause und man kann so viel machen. Ich bereite mich so auf das Rentner sein vor. 🙂 Ich arbeite jedoch durch den Lockdown, manchmal zuhause , manchmal in der Arbeit, da ich nur 3 minuten mit dem Fahrrad brauche. In der Arbeit is viel weniger Stress, was ich ebenso liebe. Eure Ecke sieht wirklich schoen aus mit der Muehle. Alles Liebe und bleibt gesund.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Liebe Ute,
      wir lieben auch diese Ruhe hier, aber auch wir beobachten, dass seit ein paar Tagen der Verkehr langsam wieder zunimmt.
      Wir sind eigentlich Rentner, aber schreiben bisweilen Artikel oder geben Interviews, was wir alles gut von zu Hause machen können und wir ja auch zuvor von zu Hause gemacht haben. Selbst bei uns ist alles weniger stressig, für alles haben wir mehr Zeit und dazu haben wir noch viel Natur, in der wir uns problemlos bewegen können.
      Ja, Cley ist echt idyllisch, ein wenig wie eine Zeitreise ins 19. Jh. Es ist schön hier zu leben. Allerdings seitdem Klausbernd vor etwa 40 Jahren hierher zog, hat es sich sehr verändert. Es ist schon sehr posh geworden.
      Mit lieben Grüßen nach London. Bleib fein gesund und munter und danke fürs Kommentieren
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  10. The empty coast road is a contrast to what it would have been like on a Bank Holiday like today. I have been observing the rules, and even though I live in Norfolk, I have not ventured north to the coast. 🙂
    Love from Beetley, Pete and Ollie. X

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Pete,
      Bank Holiday usually means here staying at home because the tourists are swarming in.
      We are privileged that we can walk to the beach without breaching the rules. Everyone does it yet you hardly meet anyone there.
      Thanks for commenting.
      Stay healthy, happy and away from people. Love ❤
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Dear Klausbernd,
    thanks for letting us know how things are in the “Little Village near the Big Sea”. And thanks to Dina for the fantastic pictures. Well, except for that of the “pea soup”. 😉
    As to the pictures: that cartoon excatly shows my fears about what will happen now, in GB and in the US. As Texas has been “opened up” quite a bit, I’m afraid tourists will flock here again and bring their infections here, where we’ve been very lucky with only three cases in all of Gillespie County just now.
    If I’m informed correctly, it’s still about 70 to 80% of all Americans who are against easing the lockdown, but what worries me, what actually makes me afraid, is the minority that violently protests for opening the country up. As you well know, there have already been the first shootings and killings because of that. Maybe that’s another good reason to just stay at home.
    Sorry about being so pessimistic. I need to look at Dina’s beautiful pictures more.
    Take care, all of you Fab Four, and stay healthy,
    Pit

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Pit,
      I notice here as well that in some people the inner fascist is surfacing. Here it’s the other way round, the ones who want stricter isolation and the isolation to go on are the militant lot. Well, not like in the US, they are not armed but they organise mobbing against the people coming in from the cities. It’s a minority but as in your country minorities can be very dangerous. – Funnily enough, I just drink a Corona Extra, this Mexican beer – As I wrote in an article “Londoner” has become a discriminating swear word. An advantage here, if you don’t have a holiday cottage here you don’t find a place for staying. We feel a bit torn, on one hand, we understand being against the Londoners moving to their holiday cottages, on the other hand, discriminating “the others” and frighten them out of here is not what we like. We know from history where this ends.
      Thanks for liking Dina’s photography. Oh dear, the pea soup … You would believe how burned peas stink.
      Stay save, healthy and happy. Keep far away from the militants
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Wir werden uns voller Sehnsucht an diese langen Wochen zurück erinnern, denke ich, an denen unsere Lieblingsorte am Meer, in den Bergen, den Wäldern, den Weiten schöner Landschaften so wundervoll leergefegt waren… England wäre in der Corona-Zeit wirklich eine Reise wert – wenn es denn möglich wäre. 😉 Beim Betrachten der Bilder von euch aus England, aus dem menschenleeren Manhattan oder dem völlig verlassen wirkenden Venedig denke ich mir immer, dass ich zur Zeit so ungemein gerne mit der Kamera dort unterwegs wäre… 😉
    Alles Liebe – und bleibt gesund!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Liebe freie Denkerin,
      deswegen fahren wir gleich in den Nachbarort, wo Dina eine leere Strandpromenade fotografieren möchte.
      Naja, einesteils kannst du doch froh sein in Deutschland zu sein, in einem Land, das, zumindest von außen betrachtet, sehr kompetent und erfolgreich mit dieser Krise umgeht. Unser Boris hier wird an Unfähgigkeit nur noch von Trump überboten, was das englische Volk ausbaden muss.
      Wir glauben wie du und wie viele hier, dass wir uns voll Sehnsucht an diese Zeiten zurückerinnern werden. Es bleibt nur zu hoffen, dass wir von dieser Krise lernen, unsere Konsumgier zu zähmen.
      Liebe Grüße, vielen Dank fürs Kommentieren und bleibe auch du gesund und munter
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Hach, diese Ruhe, diese Besinnlichkeit, ein ruhiges Ausatmen, der Zustand der Entspanntheit. Vielleicht sind in dieser Krise dies die wichtigsten Dinge, an die wir uns erinnern werden. Aber das Durchschnaufen ist auf Zeit gestundet und die Raserei und Hektik werden uns wieder einholen. Leider. Andererseits haben wir vielleicht gelernt, das so viel wichtiger geworden ist denn je. Ich will es zumindest hoffen. Lieber Klausbernd, liebe Hanne, liebe Siri und Selma, weiterhin gute Gesundheit euch und dass bald die Grenzen zu meinem geliebten England wieder offen stehen werden. Ich werde es in diesem Jahr schmerzlich vermissen , wollte ich doch nach Brontë Country.

    Liebe Grüße
    Achim

    Liked by 5 people

    • Lieber Achim,
      wir halten dir ganz fest die Daumen, dass du noch dieses Jahr wieder England besuchen kannst. Der blöde Boris hat hier ja vieles vermasselt, weswegen die Krise hier wohl etwas länger andauern wird als im besonneren Deutschland.
      Wir hoffen auch, dass von dieser Krise gelernt wird. Falls nicht, befürchten wir, dass uns eine neue ereilen wird, diesmal eine Klimakrise, mit der sicherlich weitaus schwieriger umzugehen ist. Selbst hier in Rentner-Country genießen fast alle die Entspanntheit und die Entdeckung der Langsamkeit als wichtige Qualität.
      Falls man dich wieder nach England lässt, kannst du gerne wieder vorbeikommen. Und bis dahin halte dich wacker, gesund nd munter
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ja, wir haben viel, viel Gegend. Die Küste hier und mehr noch das Inland sind sehr dünn besiedelt. Das ist alles hier Naturschutzgebiet und Seeschutzgebiet für Seehunde und Kegelrobben und Seevögel und mittendrin wir 🙂
      Ganz liebe Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • It’s here the same, very cautiously they start to discuss to take back some of the restrictions. But here a lot of people are against it. In our area, they want more isolation and a lot of people don’t mind staying for quite some more time restricted. But we live in an area where these rules and regulations don’t touch us that much. We can walk to the beach and many people have quite big gardens and hardly anybody works here.
      Anyway, we hope people will learn from this crisis.
      Tanks for commenting.
      Keep well, happy and away from people
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • We have our social contacts over the garden fence or with the two meter distance in the lanes. When we are out we always meet neighbours and we always have a chat.
      All the best
      💃👭🚶‍♂️

      Liked by 2 people

  14. The emptiness and silence is quite magical, transporting us to a nearly forgotten past. But the infections are a dark cloud over everything in New York, even on semi-rural eastern Long Island. We move and think slowly, rest and eat a lot, miss our friends and family, appreciate the kindness of strangers. Food appears on our doorstep. All is good, until we are forced to shop for food – then the masks and gloves and avoiding other people reminds us of the realities. Nurses and other front line caregivers write harrowing stories of their days. The national government stumbles about aimlessly, wanting it only to be over soon so business can resume. Amid thousands of deaths in our communities, we fear the worst is yet to come. Certainly we face months of confinement, and growing desperation among the millions now Unemployed. God give us grace to persevere!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good evening, dear Peter,
      indeed, we enjoy the silence and that we have lots and lots of time for everything. In contrast to the US quite some people, and especially in our region, want stricter isolation and want it to last for much longer than the government is planning it to be. But Boris Johnson is like a little Trump incapable of dealing with the crisis and wanting to get the economy working again. The health sector is at its limits here as well, although other European countries like Germany are having so many unused capacities that they take patients from other countries. To make people forget that it was the ruling party ruining the health system they now started a hero-cult. The caregivers are kind of worshipped as heroes. What a poor country that needs heroes! Nevertheless, we admire the caregivers who should not be in such a situation they are in now.
      We hope that people learn from this crisis otherwise the next crisis will be even more disastrous.
      Thanks for your commentary.
      Stay healthy and take care
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Peter
      sorry that you are in New York in the middle of the shit. We, 👭 Siri and Selma, keep our fingers crossed that you can cope as well as possible with the situation. We think of you and send you our healing fairy dust 💫⚡️💫
      With lots of love ❤ ❤
      Siri and Selma

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Thank you for your extremely thoughtful photo essay. We have similar scenes here in California. It is striking to see the empty parking lots at huge silicon Valley companies, for just one example. We are fortunate to live within a short drive of some magnificent hiking trails, with wildflowers. The trails are sparsely traveled these days, and everyone is extremely polite and considerate in maintaining distance. We find that more people are out for walks around the neighborhood and everyone is more friendly than usual. We have several doctors in the family and hearing their tales has been harrowing. On the other hand, I read that in the month of April air pollution on this planet was down by an average of 8%. We’ve gone for more than a month seeing little or no smog. Proves that it’s possible, but also shows what has to be done to achieve such a number. Stay well my friends. Best wishes from California.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Michael,
      everyone can see right now how much we ruined our planet with our lifestyle. We notice it here as well. We see much more wildlife, it’s quieter and everything goes slower.
      We notice as well that people are friendlier and more communicative, they help each other again like in and after the war. A lot of our neighbours contemplating changing their lifestyle, they don’t want to be part of the problem any longer. We hope that will last.
      We have to learn from this crisis otherwise the next crisis caused by global warming will follow. To cope with such a climate crisis will be much harder, we suppose.
      Thanks for commenting.
      All the best from the North Norfolk coast.
      Stay safe and healthy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much. I have noticed that the people who think that this pandemic is a hoax are the same people who deny climate change. In both cases they seem to be looking at their own immediate short term and very personal interests, and very little else. That makes it even more important that the rest of us set an exemplary example. But it is also important that we set an example that is relatively easy to follow. If it looks too hard, people won’t do it. A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. Love to you all.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, dear Michael,
      you are right. The irony is that these people following populistic ideas are those people you will suffer most under the effects of populism.
      We have to set easy to follow examples. But what is easy to follow for us is not for them. We think, in the end, only education and fair payments for work will help. Nevertheless, we have to start changing our lifestyle because we are able to.
      Love to you from the sunny seaside
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • I agree. The people following populist ideas are primarily white, and consider themselves to be, and for practical purposes actually are, the left-behinds of society. (Of course, for the most part, minorities are even more left behind.) but the populists are being manipulated for political advantage. For just one example, Trump rallies the support of coal miners in West Virginia and Kentucky and Pennsylvania and tries to save the industry. But the incidence of black lung disease is actually increasing and the life expectancy of coal miners is actually decreasing. These people cling to these jobs generation after generation because it is all they can do. Or at least, they consider that it is all they can do. A cynical view would be that the educational standards in those areas are low in order to “keep people in their place.“ so, yes, the people following populist ideas will suffer most under the effects of populism. The sad truth is that the populist leaders don’t care about their followers and their followers are too poorly educated to realize it., Of course, they are not well paid either. I agree that the relatively easy to follow examples for us are not as easy to follow by them. They don’t see the value of it. Again, for education. But now you have a situation where a large portion of the population seems to actively prefer to be ignorant. That’s the part that scares me the most. Ugh. Is your glorious thoughts for me to start my Saturday with. I think I will go out for a walk. Love from California.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Michael,
      thank you VERY much for your extensive comment that is very much appreciated 🙂 🙂
      That a large portion of the US population seems to actively prefer to be ignorant is VERY frightening indeed! In some parts of the UK society, `intellectual´ has a negative connotation but that’s different and can’t be compared with the US. Here one has to be informed – but, of course, one can read “The Sun” or “The Star” or “The Guardian”. When I worked in Montreal I was sometimes sent to US universities. I was shocked that even at universities there was no critical intellectual culture as we know it in Europe. A lot of students were amazingly ignorant. One could not survive like this on a European or Canadian (well, I only knew McGill) university. If one even finds this ignorance on the university level how common it would be on other strata of society I was wondering.
      This difference between the US and Europe makes it hard to understand the voting behaviour of the Americans. For my feeling, the UK is the nearest to the US in Europe, therefore we have a little Trump as well.
      Wishing you all the best, keep well and take care
      Klausbernd and
      The Fab Four of Cley
      💃👭🚶‍♂️

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Klausbernd,
      I completely agree on every point. We have friends and relatives in Germany and Switzerland whom we try to visit at least once a year, and we also spent time in the UK on those trips. We find it quite refreshing to be in Europe, not so much as tourists, but as simply as members of the household, for all the reasons you state. In the United States, we don’t hear the word “intellectual“ as a derogatory term as much as we hear “elite“ as a derogatory term. But I believe both invectives are pointing in the same direction. Many, but not all, of those on the right are less well educated than many, but not all, of those on the left. I believe that is as true in the UK and Europe and the rest of the world as it is in the United States. This would put me in the category of the “elites.” And from the viewpoint of a factory worker in Detroit, I suppose I am. I am reasonably affluent, fairly well educated, and have an active intellectual curiosity. So many of the things that I know about, and am interested in, and — most importantly — am concerned about in the world, he doesn’t understand. People often feel threatened by things they don’t understand. But how much of his individual and broader cultural scene do I not understand? And do I not feel threatened by that? If I’m honest, I do. He doesn’t understand and scoffs at my preference for good wine and craft beer, and I have a hard time understanding how he can stand to drink Budweiser. (But here’s a difference: I drank Budweiser for years, but he’s never tasted the better stuff.) In a grand view of overall importance of issues, these differences in preference of drink are microscopically minor, but they are flags of a much larger and more dangerous situation. When one doesn’t understand something, one feels different from it, and that makes it very easy for one to pull away from it and then turn and start to attack it. As he and I might do on the subject of beer or food preference – I tend more toward vegetarian, but not completely. That, we can live with. But what about issues of social justice and climate change? What about issues of “what if we open up the economy too soon and therefore create an even larger spike at this pandemic?” But this guy needs to get back to work. Now. His life and family depend on it. Trump’s on his side – or at least for political purposes he SAYS he is – and is pushing to open the economy. The cynic in me says it’s mostly so he can get votes in November. But that doesn’t change the fact that the guy in Detroit really does need an income. Now. So Trump tries to ram opening up too soon down the throats of all of us. Just as he rams down our throat the criminal relaxation of environmental policies set up by Obama. But, on the other side, Obama rammed those policies down the throats of those who didn’t understand their importance and simply saw them as threats to how they do business. And they actually ARE threats to how they do business. Obama rammed “Obamacare” down the throats of those who didn’t want it. Now Trump is ramming the undoing of Obamacare down the throats of those who do want Obamacare. The issue here is an extremely dangerous and increasing polarization of society. There seems to be a mutual lack of understanding of one side of the other, and an apparent preference to not make any real effort understand — on either side. We really do have to make an effort to understand — both sides. And as a result of that effort we need to actually be up understanding. Unfortunately, climate change is not going to wait for us to settle our differences. The ones on the right do not seem to be inclined to reach out to understand. Not even a little bit. They don’t see any need to. That leaves it up to us, the “intellectuals“ the “elites“ to do the reaching. That will probably involve a eating large helping of empathetic humble pie. But it probably goes down better with a good Bordeaux. Or Budweiser. This food for thought is presented with love to all of the Fab Four.
      Michael

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Michael,
      thank you so much for your wise comment that made us think 🙂 🙂
      As you do, we belong to an elite as we are well educated and don’t need too much to worry about money. We are members of one part of our society knowing not much about the other side. That first became clear to me during the student revolution when we were Marxists and wanted to fraternize with the working class. But it already failed on the level of the language that the working class didn’t understand our language and concepts. We live in two different worlds and for both side the other culture is alien. As Freud made the point, the `other´, the alien, is always frightening. This fear is one of the reasons for the gap between both sides. By the way, it’s much bigger in the English social system than it is in the German or Scandinavian. And our fear is justified, we have to sacrifice at least some of our privileges. We see it that the ‘others’ will win at our costs if we will go for a fairer society. It’s a new form of class struggle. So it’s not surprising that in Germany a new edition of Karl Marx’s “Capital” sold quite well. But whereas in the 20th and 30th of the 20th c. the workers studied in their circles Karl Marx’s writings you could not imagine this nowadays. Following Marcuse’s “One Dimensional Man” they are bribed by modern capitalism and don’t have a chance to win something more by being informed. There we are. We have to solve this problem of inequality of the two groups – Marx would have called that `classes´ – in our society. We are afraid if not, we won’t solve the next crisis that will be that caused by climate change.
      The US society seems to us more polarized as most of the European societies. In Germany f.e. more than 80% of the population agree with the actions of the government during this Corona crisis. That has to do with the welfare state system. During the student revolution, many of us saw a positive solution for our societies in the Swedish kind of welfare state under Olof Palme and in strong trade unions. To our knowledge, you don’t have this tradition in the US and Abbie Hoffman as one of the leaders of the American student moved was less socialist than hippie.
      Anyway, that were just some musings inspired by your answer. Thank you very much! 🙂 🙂
      A kind of naughty ending would be: Let’s enjoy our privileges as long as we can 😉
      With love from Good Old Europe
      Klausbernd and the rest of the gang

      Liked by 2 people

  16. It sounds as if you are well; and if so, I’m happy. The irony of benefits in this time. Air pollution’s down across the world. Nature has something back of its own. What shall we say? That we’d like the best of pre- and post-worlds, please. But all the artificial things will start up again. You’re right, at least we’ll have the pub.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Thank you very much for your comment. We had to laugh about your last sentence. And you wouldn’t believe it we are only 450 people living in our village but we even have two pubs!
      Yes, we are healthy and happy. We think that we have to learn from our experience now and how nature is recovering. It’s obvious that we can’t go on as we did before.
      We hope you are well. Take care
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear John,
      if our lifestyle isn’t changing worldwide than paradise is lost.
      Thanks for commenting.
      Take care, stay healthy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Thanks for sharing your locked down world. Looks nice to me. And I enjoyed all the signs. The one at the pub explaining that they lived there was great as otherwise they might have had complaints!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Anne,
      you are very welcome 🙂
      Our neighbours are getting very creative with their signs, children painting rainbows with fluffy white clouds on their drives and in the windows of nearly every house, you find a self-made poster.
      Stay well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Anne, we do indeed have many complaints, including quite aggressive sounding handouts from the parish council because so many second homeowners have fled the big cities and are staying here, admittedly keeping a very low profile, but never the less ignoring the advice from the government #stayathome.

      This we found in a car window, it speaks for itself:

      Liked by 2 people

    • Interesting to know you have part timers. Here in Ontario many people have “cottages” at the lakes to the north of where we live. The locals are fearing an influx this weekend as it is a bank holiday weekend and is usually the weekend when the “cottagers” go to open up their places after the winter. The locals are fearful of them emptying out the grocery stores. Also the marinas are not open so none of them can get their boats in the water etc etc. However they are all taxpayers so they do have some right. The Premier of Ontario has asked them to either stay home in the city or to take all their own food and stay for a shorter time if they must to open up thier “cottages”. They are not actually cottages but that is what they call the here.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Anne,
      your cottagers are our “Londoners”. Here they can’t get to their boats because the access to the harbours are closed. As we only have two shops around here serving a big area most of the people get their provisions delivered like we do for years already. Here te locals fear that people coming from the cities bring Corona to the countryside. Actually, it isn’t allowed to drive to our area if you don’t live here full time, meaning being registered.
      Keep well and thanks for commenting
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Fab Four of Cley,
    I realize one day the lock-down will end, but for now, I’m enjoying seeing empty streets, neighbors and strangers being ever more careful with their health and yours. I enjoy the articles that announce how Nature is bouncing back without constant interference from humans and ozone holes in the atmosphere are closing. I love the sign in the window thanking people for coming together by staying apart and people are finally their “honey-do lists” completed (like power-washing the patio! 🙂
    Thank you for the post and brightening my day. Stay safe and enjoy the wekend!
    GP Cox

    Liked by 4 people

    • Our dear friend GP Cox,
      we are very happy that we have brilliant weather, sunshine and warm, every day since the lockdown started.
      Here in our nature reserve we immediately noticed how wildlife took over again, first the marshes then even the empty roads. It’s quiet and everything goes slower. People becoming quite creative painting their posters you find in nearly every window and a happy friendliness is spreading. We help each other with shopping and even with gardening. We are busy working down our “honey-do list” – more or less successfully 😉
      We hope that people will learn from this crisis and that our way of life will have changed after this lockdown.
      Thanks for your kind words as always. Take care, stay safe and healthy as well
      Love
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  19. Clean air, happy wildlife, chores done, tourist free towns and beaches… sounds awfully good. Too bad we had to have a pandemic to get there! Burned pea soup and a closed pub. Not so good. Great post and photos— as always. –Curt

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good morning, dear Curt,
      thanks for liking our post. You are right, it’s a shame that we needed a pandemic to really become aware of what we were doing to our planet.
      The burned peas stunk horribly for days although opening all our windows.
      Stay safe and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I am so happy to read the comments regarding the lock down. I too am hoping we all learning to change our habits and consume less, enjoy the quieter things in life and return to a less frenetic way of living. Seeing others say the same gives me hope. Loving the wide uncluttered space and room for wildlife to breathe once more. Maybe your burnt pea pot could be an art installation, ‘life in lockdown’? 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Bella,
      yes, Dina transformed this pot of burned peas into a work of art. She did several photographs of it she then edited in arty and funny ways. You would believe it how much the pot of these peas was stinking, really heavily so that Selma calls them `stinkpeas´ and that after more than a week.
      Now it seems to us that people will learn but the question is will they forget soon again.
      Stay healthy, happy and away from people!
      Love
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Toch blij dat het wat minder strikt is.Eerst geopereerd in december en dan de corona pandemie zodat ik al van9 december thuis zat..Gewoonlijk red ik het wel alleen maar nu ik niet op wandel kom begon het heel zwaar te wegen maar plichtbewust als ik benheb il me altijd aan de regels gehouden

    Liked by 5 people

    • We wish you all the best. We hope you will get well soon and when you are fit again that this lockdown has come to its end.
      All the best wishing you
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Things have changed here in Aotearoa/New Zealand. We have moved down from Alert Level 4 to 3 and can now do click and collect for most things. Yesterday, on the way to the nursery for replacement herbs, I was amazed at how different everything seems. Note this is the first time I have been anywhere in the car for six weeks. The streets had few cars and pavements that usually bustle with pedestrians were EMPTY. Not just not as busy, but empty.
    The birds were out in force and could be heard over the gentle hum of the traffic – that cannot last, but is to be enjoyed while it does.
    And the pot. Oh dear, I forgot the apples were stewing and was greeted with a similar sight. But the wildly expensive, beautiful green cast iron pot has been recycled. It now holds a bevy of coloured cyclamen on the table outside the door. Recycle, reuse, reform.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Judith,
      that sounds very similar to our experience here as well. Like you, we are amazed how much everything looks changed when empty and when there is no traffic. It’s a pity that we needed a pandemic to become aware of how disturbing our lifestyle is. We like very much too that everything is much slower and, of course, that a happy friendliness is spreading. People help each other and everyone you pass by with 2 m distance is talking to you.
      The UK is the most hit country in the whole of Europe because of the incapable Boris Johnson who acted much too late although being warned. But our Alert level will be reduced tomorrow as well. A lot of people think that’s much too early.
      We hope you stay healthy and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Just goes to show once again that there are generally positives and negatives to everything. Perhaps some people might live more in harmony with nature and, more importantly, with each other once this finally passes. Perhaps people will have discovered or rediscovered the joys of reading, playing games, working puzzles, and cooking/baking. Perhaps they’ll appreciate more the jobs that teachers, first responders, health care people, and others do. Perhaps they’ll appreciate their families more and realize the value of work. Perhaps they’ll realize that they can be happy without buying things, that helping others is fun, that being able to be outside is a blessings. Perhaps.

    Stay well.

    janet

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Janet,
      you are absolutely right, people have to learn all this what you are writing about to survive. It seems to us looking around at our neighbours they have learned their lesson but – and this is a big BUT – how long will their insights last. We were amazed that we already get advertisements sent for flying to exotic countries. We were shocked, everyone should have noticed that especially travelling by air is very destructive. Well, in a way every travelling makes the traveller to part of the problem as every unnecessary consume does.
      Anyway, we will see and hope for the best.
      Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  24. Ah, I have pots like that too, and for the same reason. I now have my computer set up on the end of my kitchen bench. 🙂
    What lovely photos. They make me feel rather emotional for many reasons, not the least of which is the affect of climate change and over-tourism on precious habitats, but also because so many communities rely on these natural resources as a source of income. It is a conundrum. Perhaps when everything returns to “normal”, provision may be made for nature reserves to have regular holidays (an annual or mid-week break) from traveling folk. Just a thought.
    Take care.
    Regards.
    Tracy.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good morning, dear Tracy,
      most of the tourist visiting our nature reserve and area are birdwatchers, Cley next the Sea is called “the Mecca of Birdwatching”, or they are nature lovers wanting to see the seals. Those people are nature-compatible and there are not so many. We try to regulate this tourism by having very few places for accommodation and also few restaurants and that access to the really grand nature is not made easy. Our problem is people passing through our village on the coast road. There is quite a lot of traffic during the holiday season or on the bank holidays with bright sunshine and warm weather like today.
      Well burning food – Hanne ‘s solution is to use it for a work of art.
      Thanks 🙂 🙂 Stay healthy and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ah, I see. The wetland looked so beautiful, I just imagined that everybody would want to pay a visit to the birds. 🙂 I guess people prefer a country drive. Which is nice too, except of course, for the lockdown.
      I will stay well. I hope you and your community do too.

      Liked by 2 people

    • We managed to stay well until now and hope that this will last. Here it’s not such a problem to keep distance.
      Cley marshes are an important area of the international wetland sheme. We have a modern big visitor and education centre informing about the nature here. But that is closed now.
      All the best to you. Take care
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Cynthia,
      we do more or less the same. We don’t have woods here but the sea, so we walk on the empty beaches and through the salt marshes.
      All the best to the Pacific from the Atlantic.
      Keep well
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  25. A profound post and a very interesting discussion. This is a narrative that is evolving and the messages will change over time. We are living in uncertain times and there are many who are suffering – lost jobs, backlogs in surgeries, inability to pay rent, mental health issues. Conversely, it is a time of reflection, of silence, of inner journeys. British Columbia is looking at reopening us slowly, but the disruption (social & economic) has changed the way out generation will engage. Take care, stay safe, be well. It is good to have friends at this time. Much love and many hugs to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Clanmother Rebecca,
      it’s amazing how the narrative is changing in our society as it is in the comments here. The message is will we learn from this situation and will our insights last.
      The crisis shows clearer the split in our societies. If this gap is widening, as it is now, we will not be able to cope with the next crisis that will surely come and will be one of climate change. We live in an area of retired intellectuals like us. There we are not so much confronted with all the social problems. People cope here quite well, for most of our neighbours’ life hasn’t changed much. The dark side of this crisis we know from the media and we shouldn’t suppress it.
      With lots of love from sunny seaside ❤ ❤ ❤ Stay healthy and take care
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree with your brilliant insights, Klausbernd. We must work together in this for, without question, the greater challenge that we will face is climate change. This pandemic is only a subset of this issue. What I most appreciate about our discussions is your recognition of the possibilities, of the potential good that comes out of every situation. With a clear mind and a open heart, we can engage in the problem solving. Every act, however small, that fosters wholistic living, has the power to become exponential when joined in with others. Take good care and stay safe, my dear friend, The Fab Four of Cley.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, dear Clanmother Rebecca, for your kind words 🙏🙏
      Siri and Selma 👭 think that this pandemic is the test for the bigger challenge that is coping with climate change. We believe we will cope because we have to. If one looks at the history amazingly mankind coped with a lot of challenges. We suppose the question will be how do we cope and what price we have to pay.
      With love ❤ hugs 🤗 and kisses xxxx to our dear Canadian friend
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
      Have a great Sunday. After a hot summer's day yesterday, we have horrible weather today, cold, windy and rainy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much 🙂 🙂
      We are going tonight to our next village to photograph the moon rising over a very high tide.
      Keep well, happy walking with your phone
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. These are beautiful, beautiful shots and a heartfelt story-telling 🙂 Love the big skies, clear roads and wonderful portraits of the locals and essential workers, it was very kind of you to stop by and give them credit for what they do 🙂 Hope all is well in your part of the world, will measures be relaxed soon? Stay safe and happy weekend, you guys!! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Alexandra,
      we expect that measures will be relaxed starting tomorrow. But we have to admit we don’t feel the restrictions that much as most of us having big gardens and the sea on our doorstep.
      Our area is a big nature reserve famous for the birds and seals and its big blue skies.
      Thank you so much for liking our post which is very much appreciated 🙂 🙂
      You stay healthy and happy as well. Do you have a lockdown in Bulgaria too?
      Love from the sunny seaside
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • we did have a lockdown for two months, but it was called off a few days back 🙂 hope the relaxed measures work out well and you get to have that beer in the pub for comfort very soon 🙂 cheers you lovely people 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Alexandra,
      we will have relaxed measures from the coming week onwards but it will take a while until we can enjoy our beer in the pub. Until then we happily drink at home 🙂 🙂
      Cheers our dear Bulgarian friend
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  27. My dear fabulous four friends,
    The opening line of this post is an excellent it lingers with me. In a way, the Covid-19 pandemic is a prime example of a black swan; – a term coined by the writer Nassim Nicholas Taleb to describe very high impact events that are unimaginable before they actually happen.
    But the COVID-19 pandemic should not really be a black swan event. Epidemiologists have been warning for decades that a pandemic of a novel flu strain was inevitable. There have been a number of scares over the past two decades, such as the SARS and the swine flu. Will our countries be better prepared in the distant future?

    Living in a remote village with mostly retired residents it’s obvious the pandemic has hit you personally softly and you’re not suffering like many others like Clanmother is mentioning.
    I will not start a discussion about the events in Stockholm and the rest if Sweden, it’s controversial, but we are not in a lockdown like the rest of the world. I can visit my sommerstuga like always and that’s where I’m heading now.
    I miss you all very much, hope to meet again soon.
    Stay safe and keep well.
    Kram
    Annalena x

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Annalena,
      Friends of mine in Jadebusen, Germany have three beautiful black swans. When I see a black swan next, it will definitely remind me of Covid-19 and the very high impact events that are unimaginable before they actually happen have on us all. Food for thoughts 💭
      Enjoy your stuga in skjärgården and stay safe.
      🤗🤗🤗🤗

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Annalena,
      our pandemic is indeed a classical example of the so-called black swan theory, it came as a surprise, has a major effect and could have been expected. Well, to our knowledge it was expected by Obama and B. Gates. That it hit that drastically is due to the stupidity and inability of Trump and Boris Johnson. It’s their fault that the US and the UK have so many deads and, of course, such an impact on their economy. One sees it again populism is deadly.
      Indeed, we are not that much hit. Our life hasn’t changed much although we enjoy that everything runs more slowly and that wildlife is recovering. We walk every day through the village or to the beach or working in our garden that looks really great now.
      We hope that we meet again soon, VERY MUCH so and 👭 Siri and Selma are starting their fairy magic that it will happen very soon.
      Here the restrictions will be relaxed from tomorrow onwards.
      Love
      KRAM ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Das genießt bald das erste Bier im Pub und denkt an die schönen und ruhigen Zeiten zurück. Was ich schade finde ist, dass die meisten Menschen nichts aus der ruhigen gelernt haben und in die Zukunft tragen. Bei uns gelten die Lockerungen nun schon seit ein paar Tagen und es ist unmöglich, wie unverantwortlich und beinahe aggressiv sich einige der Gesellschaft ihre “Rechte” zurückfordern, ohne Rücksicht auf Verluste. Bedenklich.
    Nun denn, eure Fotos sind so schön, da bekommt man Fernweh. LG Nele

    Liked by 4 people

    • Liebe Nele,
      oh dear, wir hofften ja, dass die Leute lernen würden. Sollte dies eine Illusion sein?
      In unserer Gegend kämpfen die Leute, für uns bisweilen zu militant, dafür, dass die Restriktionen schärfer sein und länger anhalten sollten. Wir leben in einem kleinen idyllischen Dorf privatisierender Intellektueller. Da sind wir nicht so betroffen, da fast jeder für deutsche Verhältnisse einen riesigen Garten hat und dazu noch das Meer vor der Haustüre. Rechtebeschneidung ist hier kein Thema.
      Wir lesen, dass du Lektorin bist. Bei welchem Verlag arbeitest du denn? Ich merke, dass seit der Ausgangssperre die Verkäufe meiner eBücher diejenigen der Print-Versionen überholt haben. Außerdem ist es erstaunlich, wie viele Interviewanfragen z.Zt. von meiner Lektorin an mich weitergeleitet werden. Das Buchgeschäft hat sich ja scheinbar gut an die Krise angepasst. Besonders die Verkäufe in China laufen wieder gut. Wie ist denn deine Erfahrung mit der Bewältigung der Krise im Buchgeschäft?
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom Meer.
      Halte dich gesund
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      ich bin nicht für einen Buchverlag, sondern für ein Medienunternehmen tätig. Dort lektoriere ich Ratgeber-Artikel von Autoren, die für uns tätig sind. Wir können seit der Pandemie kaum vor Arbeit retten. Es ist ein Wahnsinn, wir haben so viel zu tun, dadurch, dass die Leute so viel lesen im Moment. Für meine selbst verlegten Werke merke ich nur einen leichten Aufschwung. Aber es handelt sich ja auch um Fachliteratur. Dafür spielt die Zeit wohl keine Rolle. Eine Bekannte hingegen schreibt Romane und hat noch nie so viele Bücher verkauft wie im Moment. Von daher deckt sich das mit deinen Wahrnehmungen.
      LG Nele

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Nele,
      ich verdiente ebenfalls mein Geld weitgehend mit Sachbüchern zur Symbolik und Farbe. Allerdings schrieb ich dazu Romane und auch Drehbücher zu den Themen meiner Sachbücher fürs Fernshen. Witzig, da waren wir in der gleichen Sparte tätig, naja, du bist es noch.
      So, jetzt wird Rhabarber geerntet und einige Beete benötigen dringend Wasser. Es ist so trocken hier, dass die Pflanzen leiden.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom Meer
      Klausbernd 🚶‍♂️

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Es ist ja auch das Vogelschutzgebiet.
    Da meine Familie jetzt entdeckt hat, dass ich Schutzmasken seit 2011 im Keller hatte, sind sie etwas anders…
    Jetzt, da viele in Panik verfallen, sind sie vollkommen ruhig!
    Herzliche Grüße nach Cley!
    Stay happy, all shall be well…

    HipHop – Stunden: Locking and popping

    Falls ihr mal schauen wollt…wie waving geht, das müsste ich noch many lifetimes üben, bis ich es so könnte…
    Im Ballett suchen wir ja eher die Stabilität und die Achse…
    In Demut eure Pia

    Liked by 4 people

    • S U P E R
      Liebe Pia,
      danke, toll dieses Video 🙂 🙂 Siri und Selma 👭 beginnen schon zu üben.
      Wir haben auch eine Schublade von Masken, die wir sonst benötigten, wenn wir etwas abschleifen wollten.
      Die Vögel zwitschern hier morgens und abends, als ob sie an einem Wettbewerb teilnehmen würden. Höchst erstaunlich!
      Alles Liebe dir
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ja ja, wer wohl am besten sänge…zur schönen Maienzeit…
      Habe mich ein wenig mit dem Tuli Vogel beschäftigt.

      Also richtig trennen ist auch eine Kunst!
      Vir: indogermanisch uiro-s? ansonsten: Mensch/Mann, ja was jetzt? Irish: fear
      Bei “us” wird es noch schlimmer…

      Draußen im Garten kämpfen die Katzen…irgendwelche animalischen Revierkämpfe.

      Sprache als Instrument of Grace, das übe ich noch…
      Dann habe ich mir überlegt, dass ihr unbedingt mal nach Rimini müsst, Ende Juli, das ist nur ein Witz. Ein schlechter.
      Herzliche Grüße eure Pia

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebes Pialein,
      der Trailer von deinem Musical ist beeinduckend. Toll, was du da auf die Bühne stellst. Wir sind alle gaaaaaaanz stolz auf dich.
      Bei uns im Garten kämpfen die Vögel um ihre Reviere. Sie haben hier die Oberhand.
      Wir haben beschlossen zum Schutz der Natur, nur noch hier in der Gegend Urlaub zu machen. Siri 🙂 meinte richtig, warum soll man denn immer in die Ferne reisen. Die Ministerpräsidentin von Norwegen, die dicke Erna, empfahl gestern ihrer Bevölkerung im Land zu bleiben und statt in die Ferne zu reisen, lieber `mal am Wochenende in ein schönes Norwegisches Hotel zu fahren oder Urlaub im schönen Norden zu machen und ab und an ein feines Essen im Restaurant der Umgebung zu genießen, denn das stärke wieder die norwegische Wirtschaft und sei ökologisch sinnvoll. Wir fanden das toll. Dass in Deutschland die Reiseunternehmen staatliche Zuschüsse bekommen, finden wir völlig kontraproduktiv. So halten wir es mit Goethe “Warum in die Ferne schweifen? Sieh, das Gute liegt so nah“. Also kein Rimini 😉
      Viel Erfolg mit deinem Musical. Wir drücken dir fest die Daumen.
      Liebe Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Ja man muss vernünftig sein!
      Höre gerade Ola Gjeilo, ooohhhh!!!, und überlege, ob ich das Geld der Corona Hilfe nur an die zurück zahle, die auch am Training teilgenommen haben…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ja, liebes Pialein, seine Vernunft walten zu lassen, finde ich äußerst wichtig zur Zeit, zumal gerade im Netz so viele Fake News verbreitet werden, die auf Halbwahrheiten und Halbwissen beruhen. Wie schon Einstein sagte, Halbwissen ist schlimmer als Nicht-Wissen. Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma, unsere Klugen, betonen stets, man muss immer auf die Gediegenheit der Quelle achten.
      Halte dich wacker
      The ab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Begrenzungen anzuerkennen, verstehen und erweitern, ist etwas anderes, als Kontrolle darüber ausüben zu wollen, was sich nicht kontrollieren lässt, oder?
      Ich kam darauf, weil mir seit einigen Jahren auffällt, wieviele Gummiringe überall auf den Wegen herumliegen, wo ich gehe und stehe…
      Haargummis, Haushaltgummis, etc.
      Man hat ein Menschen-, Welt-, und Gottesbild (wie auch immer es zustande kommt…) dann sucht (und findet man natürlich…) Bestätigung dafür, dann rottet man sich zusammen und dann ist man Viele! Das scheint manchen Sicherheit und Gewissheit zu geben. Und Rechtfertigung ihr(r)er Taten.
      Also, ich glaube ich trinke mal Misteltee und Blutreinigungstee und mache ein paar Atemübungen zur Aktivierung meiner Gene (…)
      Heute helfen mir freiwillig 3 Männer beim Tragen von Möbeln und Umräumen der Ballettschule, undenkbar ohne Corona!!
      Außerdem veranstaltet meine Freundin MJ von SacredFireMusic Zoom-Singen. Das mache ich morgen, großartig!!! Clan Mother ist ja in Vancouver, oder?
      Außerdem gibt´s noch ne krasse Story mit Plön von mir, aber
      so wichtig ist das auch nicht mehr…
      Happy Weekend und genießt den Garten, die Sonne, das Meer!!!
      Hauptsache gesund sterben!
      Euer Pialein…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Pia,
      das Argument ist quatsch, etwas kontrollieren zu wollen, was nicht kontrollierbar ist. Es zeigt sich deutlich, dass in Staaten, in denen stärkere Beschränkungen verordnet wurden, die Zahl der Infektionen zurückgeht. Die Krise als nicht kontrollierbar zu bezeichnen, halten wir für nicht nur gefährlich, sondern das spielt auch populistischen und rechtsradikalen Gruppen in die Hände. Wir sehen das ja deutlich in Britain und den USA, dass weniger bis keine staatliche verordneten Einschränkungen zu einem Desaster führen. Wir finden, dass gerade Deutschland mit den Einschränkungen sehr erfolgreich ist. Das man Kontrolle über Nichtkontrollierbares ausübt, ist ein populistisches, völlig unüberlegtes Argument, das keinerlei reale Grundlage hat. Es ist erstaunlich wie erschreckend, wie jetzt die Rechten versuchen Oberwasser zu bekommen und alle möglichen Spinnereien verbreiten. Schlimmer noch, dass viele das glauben. Allerdings dennoch gibt es ein Lichtblick, dass nämlich die überwältigende Mehrheit der Deutschen die Aktionen der Regierung für völlig angemessen halten und der Erfolg gibt ja diesem Handeln recht.
      Clanmother Rebecca lebt in Vancouver. Sie kam uns mit ihrer Familie vor zwei Jahren in Cley besuchen.
      Wir werden jetzt, wie du schreibst, die Sonne im Garten und am Meer genießen.
      Halte dich munter und lasse dich nicht von populistischen Spinnereien beeindrucken.
      Ganz liebe Grüße vom sonnigen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Schluck🌈😅💙ich meinte ,man kann die Evolution ,Veränderung, das Leben nicht kontrollieren. Fast ist der Umbau fertig. 🙏💫es ist mir klar ,dass auf einer Erde nicht jeder tun und lassen sollte was sein Ego ihm/ ihr unterschieben will, aus welchem Grund auch immer 👍☀️

      Like

    • Liebes Pialein,
      das fanden wir sehr passend von unserem Bloggerfreund Achim Spengler (https://achim-spengler.com/):
      “Diejenigen, die da dünkeln, munkeln, hinterfragen, protestieren, Presseleute verprügeln, Polizisten anspucken, von Ermächtigungsgesetzen faseln, vom Aushebeln des Grundgesetzes tiradieren, es sind dies diejenigen, die das Dagegen als Lebenselixier begreifen, weil sie ein Dafür so schwer ertragen können wie den Zahnschmerz.”
      Das ist ja nicht gegen dich gemeint, sondern gegen eine Tendenz, die wir aus der Ferne in Deutschland beobachten. Uns ist doch klar, das du keine hirnlose Rechte bist. Aber es regt uns bisweilen auf, was die Leute da so faseln, statt dass sie einmal anerkennen, dass die deutsche Regierung bislang so vorbildlich wie erfolgreich agierte.
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Ja klar nicht gegen mich💚🌈wurde vielleicht etwas falsch verstanden und da lernte ich einmal mehr, dass ich ausreichend Worte benutzen muss um eventuell verstanden zu werden ☀️🧚‍♀️💫und nicht so viel Gedanken lesen anderer voraussetzen darf👍👍👍☀️🙏ich leide nicht mehr darunter falsch verstanden zu werden und kaufe mir zur Belohnung jetzt ein Eis. Unmittelbar um mich herum spinnen gerade ziemlich viele und ich halte mich möglichst aus allem heraus oder versuche zu vermitteln aber nicht zu viel 💚💚💚🤗💙☀️🧚‍♀️🙏

      Like

    • Echt, `nen Eis? Hier gibt’s Kuchen, liebes Pialein, und ab 18h ist ein Feierabend-Drink erlaubt – Aperol Fizz macht Masterchen wohl heute Abend, aber nicht für uns liebklugen Buchfeen. Wir finden solche Drinks voll iiiiiiieh und bekommen die eh nicht, aber dafür yummy Leckersaft.
      Nee, Gedanken lesen können wir nicht. Aber wir lesen gerade mit Masterchen einen Roman von Stephen King “The Institute”, wo es genau darum geht. Schauerlich.
      Hab’ ein rundum schönes Wochenende. Hier sind für Morgen fast sommerliche Temperaturen angesagt, da werden wir einen größeren Spaziergang machen und wie wir armen Buchfeen das kennen, müssen wir ab und an Stativ und andere Fotoausrüstung schleppen – und das auch nur für magere Feentaler. Aber wir haben uns immerhin einen Stundenlohn erkämpft 🙂 🙂
      Liebe Grüße
      Siri 👭 Selma

      Like

    • Siri, Selma, schreibt diese vielen Stunden auf, notfalls schummeln, denkt dran, die streichen manchmal einfach die Hälfte, weil sie denken, dass ihr schneller sein solltet…
      Hoffe, dass viele erkennen, dass u.a. Angst das klare Denken vernebelt und zu kontraproduktiven Aggessionen führt und ja- sie zu willkommen Opfern für sehr viel Ungutes macht…
      Also, ich schaue jetzt noch etwas in meine kleine Kristallkugel, die ich 1984/5 (?) von Alexander geschenkt bekam, der aus Plön in unsere Stadt zog, damals…
      Hahaha, das ist doch echt too much!!!
      Wie gesagt, gar nicht mehr so wichtig, all diese Datails, es wäre schön, wenn die Menschen mehr l(i)ebten – proaktiv…
      Dass die anderen an allem schuld sind, ist wirklich der bequemste Weg…
      Habe in meinem Leben sehr viele Menschen getroffen, die “alles besser” wussten und konnten, dann aber bei der kleinsten Belastung und den Problemen einfach wegknickten.
      Ich weiß nicht, was ihr macht, lieb-kluge Buchfeen, ich streiche immer, wenn es schwierig wird, dem Ganesha übers Köpfchen und schenke ihm ein Lächeln (manchmal auch Tränen, es stört ihn scheinbar nicht).
      Bin jetzt 8 Wochen allein im Ballettsaal und halte mir energetische Räubereien vom Hals, das tut echt gut!!!
      Genießt euren langen Spaziergang und behaltet die Freude im Herzen
      Das Pialein

      Es gibt keine einfachen Lösungen, Engelsgeduld, man kann mit jedem Wort nur noch mehr Widerstand auslösen, Verhärtung, Aufregung…
      Danke, dass ihr mir verraten habt, was das Masterchen gerade liest, es gruselt mich allerdings oft genug.
      Psst, wisst ihr was, meine Nachbarin hat welche angezeigt, die die Maske nicht tragen, jetzt hat sie so einige Erfahrungen gemacht, die sie differenzierter Denken lässt, leider höre ich das alles mit, nicht, dass ich lauschen würde, sie telefoniert immer sehr laut.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Pia,
      aber HALLO, das gibst du unseren lieben Buchfeen aber schlechte Ratschläge. Voll unpädagogisch.
      Wir haben gestern einen wunderschönen Spasziergang gemacht und keine Trage-Stunden gestrichen. Es war toll in einem riesigen Park eines Landgutes am Meer. Wir waren fast die einzigen dort.
      Wir haben einen kleinen dicken Sandelholz-Buddha, den wir über den Bauch streicheln, wenn’s schwierig wird. Masterchens Schwesterlein brachte ihm diesen von Buthan mit.
      Du hast wohl recht, dass ist auch unsere Erfahrung, jedes Wort kann Widerstand erzeugen und wird eh nicht gehört und bedacht. Auf der anderen Seite finden wir auch den Spruch richtig “Wer sich nicht wehrt, lebt verkehrt”. Der stammt noch Masterchens Zeit in der Studentenbewegung.
      Hier soll es diese Woche eine Hitzewelle geben, da werden wir wohl noch einige Ausflüge machen.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von uns allen
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Viele schöne Ausflüge wünsche ich euch!
      Die Nachbarin hat heute Holunderblüten über den Zaun gegeben…sie wäre gestern im Bruch (unser kleines Vogelschutzgebiet) zum Sammeln gewesen.
      Habe Holunder-Pfannkuchen gebacken! Lecker!
      Viel Sonne, nicht zuuu viel Sonne bitte, Siri, Selma, denkt dran!
      Das Singen gestern war großartig!!!!!!!!! Sehr multidimensional, also richtig guuuuu!!!
      Wird wiederholt, kost nix…
      Es gab goldene Buddhas bei Tschibo, habe ich mir einen mitgenommen, als Motivation zum Aufräumen.
      …der Odenwald ruft schon gaaaanz laut…
      Habt es schön und liebe Grüße

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Pia,
      ja, jetzt haben wir wirklich genug Sonne abbekommen und ziehen uns ins Haus zurück.
      Holunderpfannkuchen sind lecker, voll yummy! 🙂 🙂
      Jetzt werden wir mit Masterchen noch etwas lesen im kühleren Zimmer. Abends ist dann wieder großes Vogelkonzert angesagt.
      Dann habe es fein, mache es dir gemütlich.
      Mit gaaaaanz lieben Grüßen von uns allen hier
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Gerade höre ich “Sebastian” von Cockney Rebel und atme wieder gaaaaanz tief durch….
      Die liebe Renate hatte vor vielen Jahren den Laden neben der Kirche “St. Sebastian” am Marktplatz in MA übernommen, Maria Zürn Brautmoden.
      Renate ist sehr krank und schon ziemlich alt, hat aber beim Nähen von Musical-Kostümen etc. so einige Tricks drauf, ich versuche viel zu lernen, sonst geht das verloren…
      Sie meinte am Telefon: Pia, das ist eine Katastrophe, wenn das vorbei ist, kannst du die Hälfte der Menschheit in die Tonne treten, die sind dann nämlich alle verrückt geworden.
      Sie empfindet den Virus als Zeichen von ganz oben und ist ziemlich verwirrt, dass ich nicht ganz glauben kann, dass uns Gott bestrafen will mit einem Virus.
      Außerdem hat mir Stephan ein Foto von einer mächtigen Eiche geschickt, die er vor einigen Jahren mal besucht hat. Da ist ein Schild dran: Naturdenkmal B. Aufenthalt im Kronenbereich auf eigene Gefahr. Es ist klar, dass sie das Schild aufhängen müssen, sonst könnte sie ja jemand verklagen.
      Gerade überlege ich, ist es schlimmer das Rechtshirnige linkshirnig total zu entzaubern oder damit linkshirnig total Kasse zu machen…
      Leute, Leute und Feen und wer alles dies liest: Passt auf, wes Lied ihr singt…
      Singt mal etwas, was in euch selbst klingt, hört, wie die Stimme klingt, sie verrät so einiges…
      Mein Vater sagte oft: Die haben alle eine Spritze!
      Naja, ich hoffe, es nutzen viele die Zeit zur Selbstreflexion und diese Klaus-ur und Dinas Fotos und überhaupt alles, was helfen könnte “gesund” zu werden.
      …jetzt google ich noch kurz “Phantomas” und dann arbeite ich weiter…
      Herzlichste Grüße vom Pialein
      Gerade bekam ich ein Video, die Fitness Studios haben teils wieder geöffnet, sie laufen wieder auf den Laufbändern und halten sich fit, ohne Maske, na dann…das Video endet mit Mäusen, die auch auf Laufbändern laufen, im Versuchslabor…nicht so schön…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen, liebes Pialein,
      es ist kühler geworden und bedeckt, aber leider möchte es nicht regnen. Der Luftdruck fällt zwar, aber keine Regenwolke ist in Sicht. Da wir gestern einige Pflanzen geteilt und umgepflanzt haben, wäre Regen heute schon idal.
      Wir werden wohl heute im Wintergarten sitzend lesen. Dabei liest Masterchen gerade einen älteren Simon Beckett Krimi “Wiritten in Bone” und von Stephen Fry “Mythos”, die detaillierte Nacherzählung der griechischen Mythologie von moderner Perspektive aus gesehen.
      Dann verabschieden wir uns jetzt zum Lesen. Tschüss!
      Mit ganz lieben Grüßen
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Huiuiui…Danke für die Buchtipps, es soll erst morgen regnen.
      …ich filme jetzt bissel die Choreos und verschicke sie, bin zu faul für Zoom heute…
      Die Gespräche mit dem Ordnungsamt verlaufen anstrengend, suboptimal, aber man darf ja nie aufgeben…
      Eine Frau Lerch und ich werden uns schon einig.

      Frohes Lesen und liebste Grüße
      Pialein

      Liked by 1 person

    • Also, liebes Pialein, so ein richtig tolles, megagutes Buch suchen wir zur Zeit noch. Der Simon Beckett ist schon sehr gut aber nicht umwerfend 😉 Er hat den Nachteil, dass alle seine Romane sich ähneln.
      Liebe Grüße und feinen Feenhauch
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Hallihallo, liebes Pialein,
      wir drücken dir fest die Daumen für deine Gespräche mit dem Ordnungsamt. Viel Glück 🙂 🙂
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Dear Steve,
      we are out every day as well and we have brilliant weather since the lockdown too.
      We don’t feel at risk.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  30. A major element in the effectiveness of the lockdown so far has been the unusually mild weather. You in Norfolk and we in Northamptonshire enjoy delightful rural environments. But there are so many living in crowded urban circumstances for whom life could become increasingly difficult if the weather changes.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Louis
      we are fully aware of our privileged situation. Living in an apartment blog with children during this lockout must be hell and living in a small flat when the weather is grim outside like it is here right now must be horrible as well. We have our books to read, our texts to write that’s fine, but if you are not used to doing such things, if you don’t have something you can occupy yourself with it’s really hard.
      You are right, it’s important not to forget those who are not so privileged as we are.
      Thanks for your comment and mentioning these people.
      Stay well and safe
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  31. Thank you for these wonderful quiet views of my home county in lockdown! My usual walk here in the West Midlands is along the canal which has its own beauty but oh, how I miss the sea and the big open skies!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Penny,
      thank you very much for your comment 🙂 🙂
      We love the coast of North Norfolk. Coming back from holidays in other parts of the country we are always happy that we live here.
      Wishing you all the best. Stay well and safe
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Hallo Klausbernd,
    danke für Deine Schilderungen und Dinas bildliche Eindrücke zur Corona-Zeit.
    In Nürnberg hatten wir zuletzt nicht nur frühsommerliches Wetter und zuwenig Regen, sondern auch dank der Schließungen viel Ruhe vom Verkehrslärm, gute Luft und einen blauen Himmel ohne Kondensstreifen.
    “Pandemien gab es schon immer, vorbereitet war man nie.” Ja, auf dieses globale, schnelle und aggressive Corona-Ereignis waren wir nicht wirklich vorbereitet. Ein Zeitungsbericht mit Gespräch im Stadtarchiv Nürnberg handelte von Pestwellen der vergangenen Jahrhunderte. Der Rat setzte einen Arzt und eine Inspektion ein. Ihre Bücher berichten von den Ansteckungen, Krankheits- und Todesfällen. Sie erstellten Statistiken, die denen des Robert-Koch-Instituts ähneln, und offenbar nicht nur in die gegenwärtige Situation geschrieben wurden, sondern wohlweislich an die zukünftigen Generationen gerichtet waren.
    In “Siechenkobeln” außerhalb der Stadtmauern wurden Infizierte untergebracht: Lepröse und andere. Angesteckte bzw. Erkrankte mussten sich mit Zeichen ausweisen. Aus Venedig übernahm die Stadt das Konzept der Quarantäne. Auswärtige Handelsleute wurden in Plätzen vor der Stadt für Wochen untergebracht.
    Wir leiden zusammen, und wir lernen zusammen – und gehen beizeiten wieder ins Pub.
    Gute Wünsche nach Großbritannien und für Euch Fab Four.
    Herzliche Grüße, Bernd

    Liked by 5 people

    • Lieber Bernd,
      habe herzlichen Dank für deinen ausführlichen Kommentar 🙂 🙂
      Pandemien gab es schon immer, bereits Thukidides schrieb über die Pest, die von 430-426 (4 Jahre!) in Athen während der Belagerung wütete. Es folgten viele, die über Pest und Cholera schrieben und vor solchen Seuchen warnten. Diese Warnung wurden stets schnell vergessen, wenn die Seuche verschwunden war. Man erinnert sich ihrer erst wieder wenn man abermals von einer Seuche heimgesucht wird wie jetzt. Typischer Weise ist in den Buchhandlungen Englands z.B. Camus “Die Pest” ausverkauft. Wir alle sind Meister im Verdrängen. Wir finden das nachahmenswert, dass in eurem Stadtarchive dieses Thema aufgegriffen wurde. Man könnte ja einiges aus der Geschichte lernen. Auf der anderen Seite zeigt leider die Geschichte und die Geschichten, dass Warnungen meist nicht ernst genommen werden, wie schon Laokoons Warnung im Trojanischen Krieg. Die Warner werden oftmals diskriminiert. All das sind klassische Beispiele für Freuds Theorie der Verdrängung als motiviertes Nicht-Sehen-Wollen. Das war doch auch typisch z.B. für Trump und Johnson zu Beginn der Viruskrise, die nun versucht wird, politisch auszunutzen.
      Wir lasen gerade von Patrick Deville “Pest & Cholera”, ein Buch, das sich als Roman anpreist, das aber auch als Sachbuch gelesen werden kann. Es ist die Lebensgeschichte von Alexander Yersin, der 1894 den Pestbazillus identifizierte. Unter anderem wird in diesem Text die politisch motivierte Konkurrenz zwischen Pasteurs Institut und dem Robert Koch Institut erwähnt.
      Mit herzlichen Grüßen nach Nürnberg. Halte dich gesund und munter
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Vielen Dank für den ausgiebigen historischen Rückblick!
      Vier Jahre Seuche unter Belagerungszustand, wie von Athen genannt, mag ich mir gar nicht wirklich vorstellen wollen, da beginnt schon der eigene Moment des Verdrängens.
      Die Warner, Kassandras oder Whistle Blower haben es da schwer.
      Danke auch für den Hinweis auf Alexander Yersin, wohl eine spannende Biografie.
      Alle guten Wünsche und beste Grüße, Bernd

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Bernd,
      ja, wir wollen nicht hören, was nicht in unser Konzept passst. Deswegen haben es die Warnenden so schwer. Und heutzutage ist es bisweilen für den Laien auch schwer zu bestimmen, was fake news und was berechtigte Sorgen sind.
      Vier Jahre Seuche im Belagerungszustand, verglichen damit ist unsere Situation völlig harmlos. Wir nehmen jedoch an, dass im klassischen Altertum die Leute so unterschiedlich von unserem heutigen Lebensstil lebten, dass wir es uns nicht vorstellen können, was das bedeutete.
      Die Yersin Biografie haben wir mit Freude gelesen. Es geht dort nicht nur um die Bekämpfung von Seuchen sondern auch um sein abenteuerliches Leben als Forschungsreisender. Uns hat das alles fasziniert, da wir zuvor nichts von Yersins Leben wussten.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von der heute stürmischen See
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Danke Klausbernd,
      Wind und Wetter sind heute aus Nordwest herübergekommen. In den letzten Frühlingstagen galt, mich ans Maskentragen zu gewöhnen, und heute kamen Sturmböen und Regenschirm dazu.
      Unserer recht trockenen Region tut es gut.
      Gute Zeit und schöne Grüße
      Bernd

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lieber Bernd,
      wir brauchten unbedingt etwas Regen, ein Mantra, dass wir jedes Jahr laufen lassen. Wir können etwas über 1600 ltr. Regenwasser speichern, die wir aber bald verbraucht haben. Dann können wir noch regelmäßig aufs Badewasser zurückgreifen, aber das sind ja nicht genug Liter für unsere Gartengröße. Naja, unsere Pflanzen haben das jedes Jahr überlebt und immer litten wir etwas mit ihnen. Es ist hier ein Trockengebiet, da wir im Regenschatten der Berge an der Westküste liegen. Hier wird alles mit künstlicher Bewässerung angebaut. Da wir jedoch bei guten Böden zu den Top 5 der Sonnenscheindauer in Gebieten Europas gehören, lohnt sich der Anbau trotz Bewässung.
      Hier bei uns sieht man nur extrem selten, dass einer einen Mundschutz trägt, außer diejenigen, die Krankenbesuche machen.
      Windig ist es hier auch, aber das sind wir gewöhnt als Küstenbewohner.
      Hab’s fein, liebe Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  33. I like the last sentence – I can hear the contradictions in it – regret that the roads will be busy again, gratitude that the pleasures of the pub will be enjoyed again. It’s a little like that here, but not quite – our island has a large percentage of its land given to parks, all of which are open now (the big state park was closed for 6 weeks but reopened last week). People are using the trails more than ever before, it seems. There are now signs at trailheads specifying no more than 10 cars at a time….people are generally good about stepping aside on the trails, though not always…on good weather weekends I avoid the parks because the people working from home all week are there…and I remember winter weekdays when no one is around, with longing. But I also long for the small bookstore/cafe to reopen so I can sit there and enjoy a really good treat in the company of good people. It’s going to be interesting to see which behavior changes stick and which are cast aside. I enjoyed the photos very much – it’s interesting to see how another small town by the water looks… thank you!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Lynn,
      thanks for your comment from the other end of our planet. From today onwards we have no more restrictions to go out. Before we were only allowed to go out into nature once a day if we keep the distance of two meters to others. So our beach was empty but in the village, we locals met. Every time you meet somebody in the streets you stop for a chat and although we keep distance we feel closer together. There are really hardly any cars on the roads what we really like. We can shop provisions and now garden centres are open from this week onwards but all the other shops are still closed. From the beginning of the lockdown, we had really great weather, sunshine and warm. So we spend a lot of time in our garden.
      Wishing you all the best. Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s so good that you were able to chat in the village. We are, unfortunately, a car culture here, which kills that small-scale social interaction. We had a better chance for socializing when cafes were open but that’s gone for now. And we still have cars on the roads because we need them to get to the grocery store – but there are far fewer than there were before. I’m glad you have been enjoying the garden – maybe there will be pictures soon! 🙂 Enjoy your week and stay healthy!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Lynn,
      we have a totally different attitude to driving here. Nearly all locals don’t use their cars for walking distances under half an hour and we often walk to our next village for shopping that takes more than an hour (round trip). As we live in a nature reserve the ecological consciousness is quite high here. Doing a lot of walking we meet people all the time.
      We spend lots of time in our garden, working but enjoying it too. We read and eat there and Dina has trained the songbirds to come to her and we feed our pheasants.
      Our problem is that’s much too dry here. We have to water our plants twice a day. But soon our water butts are empty and then we have to water using the mains. We try to avoid this.
      With love from
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • 🙂 The beauty of village life! It would take me close to an hour just to get to the (take-out only) coffee shop, and significantly longer to get to a grocery store. Oh well! Your garden life also sounds wonderful, but I’m sorry about the drought. We have had trouble with too little rain now and then, but we’re good right now. Who knows what the summer will bring? I hope it brings you more rain.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Lynn,
      we love this village life, well, Cley next the Sea is a small coastal village with only 450 inhabitants. To live here we have social conacts to our neighbours and a shop as well but we only need a few steps to be in grand nature. Neighbours are important in our life as nature is.
      You seem to live quite isolated. Yoiu can hardly live like this in England.
      We are amazed that you had sometimes too little rain because we always thought you live in an area with a lot of rain all through the year – well, at least that we learned at school in our geography lessons.
      Thanks and cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • The rain…Fidalgo island is, ecologically speaking, one of the San Juan Islands. We’re closer to the mainland than the others but we share a unique ecology with them. We’re in what’s called the Olympic rain shadow. You’re right about the Pacific northwest being famous for abundant rain, but the rainfall is greatly reduced in the rain shadow, so much that we can experience drought conditions at times. The Olympic Mountains, to our west, get hit with all the rain that’s built up as clouds cross the ocean. The clouds are pushed up against the mountains and their moisture is released, almost all of it on the west side of the Olympics. There’s not a lot of moisture left after that. Besides the San Juan Islands, there are also towns on the Olympic Peninsula which are located on the dry side of the mountains. One of those towns (Sequim, WA) is famous for lavender farms, and you know lavender likes it dry and sunny! It’s an unexpected crop for the Pacific Northwest. 🙂 Sequim might get 18 inches of rain/yr while a town on the ocean side of the Olympics (where the temperate rain forests are) could get 120 inches – and the two places are only 90 miles apart. (And yes, there’s certainly more space in the US West than in Gb or most European countries…not to say that some people don’t live in small villages and walk more, but still, we Americans are married to our cars!).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Lynn,
      thank you very much for your explanation 🙂 🙂 Now we know more 🙂
      Norfolk is famous for its lavender. We have huge lavender farms here at the coast. In our garden, we grow lavender as well. Five different varieties are happily growing in our garden. Our lavender has to be controlled otherwise it takes over all the garden. You are right, we didn’t expect lavender growing at the Pacific Northwest.
      By the way, we love our car as well, Siri 🙂 and 🙂 Selma even gave it a name. But we haven’t moved it for quite a while now. We use it mainly for our holiday trips and for shopping too.
      Keep well.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Absolutely wonderful! Thank you both for the lovely photographs and for allowing me a virtual stroll in your area. I had hoped to visit there while I was house and pooch sitting near Ely, Cambridgeshire for 4 weeks this past February to March. Alas, too many stormy days kept me from venturing too far afield. And then, because of the virus, I had to return to the US a bit earlier than planned.
    One day, one day, one day…I hope to return to the UK, one of my favorite places aside from my country of birth, Germany.
    Always looking forward to your posts.
    With kind regards and wishes for continued health, peace and joy,
    Vera from Maryland

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dear Vera,
      our dear Master is from Germany as well but he moved to the coast of North Norfolk about 40 years ago. We live in Cley next the sea in the middle of a big nature reserve famous for the sea birds and seals. When we go from London to Norfolk we always have to change trains at Ely. Ely is not that far from where we live. The next time you are in Ely again it’s worth going to the Norfolk coast which is rated as an area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB).
      Thanks for commenting.
      Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

  35. Dear Fab Four, I must commiserate with you about your spoilt pan and your stinky peas! Burnt peas smell so awful! I am glad you have enjoyed the peace of lockdown with no visitors and time for gardening and covering your house with dirt from the patio. Such lovely pictures of your village, its people and the beach! The skies have been wonderful this past week – deep blue with lots of little white clouds – just like in your photos. We have been very quiet here and have spent a lot of time in our garden and taking walks across the fields and down the lanes. We have kind neighbours and want for nothing except the freedom to visit our friends and family again.
    Best wishes for a happy and healthy week ahead
    Clare 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    • Good morning, dear Clare,
      it seems to be that we are in a similar actually quite privileged situation. We have the beach to walk to or we can hike through the fields inland. Our life hasn’t that much changed. We were so lucky that from the beginning of the lockdown we had beautiful weather as, we suppose, you had as well.
      We noticed today that the traffic increased slightly. That we are allowed to go out more than once a day is quite an improvement. Friends we meet in our village lanes with a distance of two meters apart having long chats. Fortunately, we miss not much.
      Wishing you a wonderful week. Keep well
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree it will be good to be able to go out more than once a day and from Wednesday,to be able to drive to places other than the shops or the doctor! We will take our daughter to see the sea as it makes her feel calm and happy.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Love your photos of the countryside, the people in masks, and the everyday tasks still going on. Really like the sign that encourages people to be kind, and I hope it works. We have similar pictures here in Knoxville, Tennessee, but many people are coming out, driving, etc. Today, I went to the beauty salon, something I haven’t done in almost two months. I’m ready to look better and to be involved in life, but not to forget how much I have loved staying home!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much for liking Dina’s photo documentation of the lockdown at our village.
      It’s our experience that this sign works, most of the people are very kind now, in a way kinder than before.
      Since the weekend more people are going out here as well, the traffic has slightly increased although there are still only a few cars on roads what we really enjoy.
      Hairdressers and beauty salons are not open here, so we try to cut the hair ourselves sometimes producing quite an avantgardistic haircut.
      Stay well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  37. wonderful report on your village during the covid
    Each region must have its own regulations it seems to me
    In France (and it scares me) they reopened the borders and people coming from the European economic area can return WITHOUT a fortnight … I find it appalling and it is a gateway for the virus reappears, especially since in my country there are new homes
    I hope that with you it goes better

    Liked by 3 people

    • England reacted much too late as it has an incapable minister-president, Boris Johnson, the little Trump. But we are doing well here in rural England.
      From our perspective, it’s a risk that Germany will open its borders. From the English and Scandinavian perspective, Germany coped best from all the European countries and was very successful getting infections down. On the other hand, the economy is asking for open borders again. Looking at France from an English perspective, we think that Macron is doing quite well too.
      The problems are the cities. Here in England, everyone who can tries to escape to the countryside. We try to stop this with the help of our local government. We just read that house prices in the country are strongly rising whereas in the cities they are decreasing Europe-wide. Maybe, it’s the end of the cities?
      Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  38. The lockdown has loosen the grip of cars and mass tourism in many places – included here in Bergen. I do enjoy the result, but would have liked it to not be caused by a pandemic. But maybe we human beings can learn something and see what could be the alternative to our consumer ever faster society. Your village looks so British and a place I would like to visit – and then of course I see that writing that is a paradox or counter to what I just wrote. As always the photos are gorgeous. Might have to try some twirly coffee one day.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Otto,
      here the lockdown has loosened its grip as well. But we have been in our next bigger market town for shopping and it was spooky, like a ghost town, nearly no cars and only a few people were out walking in the streets and went shopping. All in all, the traffic did slightly increase, we can’t stroll in the middle of the coast road any longer. But we don’t mind. People are speaking about using their cars not so often any more but we’ll see how long it will last.
      Indeed, our village is English as English can be. For people here, it’s important to be ENGLISH and not British. They celebrate their Englishness what we really like. Actually, the main influence were the Vikings here. The Viking empire at its peak under king Canute was ruled from Norfolk. We still celebrate Viking festivals twice a year and our next village proudly declared that it was there where the Vikings set foot on the island. That’s pure phantasy, of course.
      Anyway, you are very welcome at ours.
      Keep well and happy
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Sorry to use the word “British”. I know one has to be careful, and use words like English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish appropriately. The question then arises, does anyone actually feel British at all? Thanks for the invitation. We have talked this before, and I still want to come an see. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Otto,
      no need to apologize.
      There are hardly any people feeling British. Most feel English, Welsch or Scottish. Maybe in Northern Irland it’s different. Most people who show a flag in front of their house here show the English flag, the red cross on white background – the St. George Cross.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear RH
      we are very happy to give you a new word for your everyday lingo. The word `vermasseln´ goes back to German rogue language and is used in so-called standard language from 1900 onwards.
      Thank you for liking our post.
      You stay well and peaceful too
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Annette,
      wir können das im Grunde nur von unserem Dorf aus beurteilen. Da gibt es das große Problem, dass Leute aus den Städte in ihre Sommerhäuser und Zweitwohnungen auf das Land ziehen. Das ist zwar verboten, aber es wird relativ wenig dagegen unternommen. Die Einheimischen der Dörfer werden zunehmend mehr fremdenfeindlich. “Londoner” ist z.B. zu einem bösen Schimpfwort geworden. Irgendwie gab’s auch hier Lockerungen des Lockdowns, aber was das genau umfasst, ist uns nicht klar. Auf jeden Fall war es letztes Wochenende erlaubt, die Strände zu besuchen. Einzelne Küstenorte versanken in Abfall. Wir sahen Filme, in denen z.B. in Cornwall ganze Küstenstreifen wie ein Abfallhaufen aussahen. Wir haben hier dieses Problem nicht, wohl auch deswegen, da bei uns die Zufahrtsstraße zum Strand noch gesperrt ist. Trifft man Leute im Dorf, wird problemlos der Sicherheitsabstand eingehalten. Man kommuniziert mehr mit den Nachbarn und kauft gegenseitig für andere ein. Die Supermärkte und kleineren Lebensmittelläden sind offen, es besteht keine Maskenpflicht. Was für die Engländer wichtig ist (und auch für uns), die Gartencentre haben wieder geöffnet. Alle Leute hier haben viel in ihren Gärten gearbeitet, die vorbildlich aussehen. Wir sind gerade dabei, Stück für Stück unseren Rasen zu vertikotieren, zu düngen und nachzusäen. Zum Glück hat sich gerade heute das Wetter geändert nach knalle Sonnenschein und sommerlicher Wärme, aber auch großer Trockenheit. Was für unsere Rasenaktion ideal ist.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von Nord Norfolk nach Dortmund
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Like

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